1918-19 (55)

These are the stories behind those who fell between 1918-19

Written by

William Paterson MacDonald

Royal Sussex Regiment

16th Batt. Royal Sussex Regiment
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 9.

The family home was at 19, Maitland Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Lachlan and Mary MacDonald.
Siblings: William had two younger brothers, Lachlan and James, and two younger sisters, Lizzie and Flora.

William MacDonald was the eldest son of Lachlan and Mary McDonald, born and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a carter.
He served in the Royal Sussex Regiment and was killed in action at the age of 21.
His remains were recovered from Herlies British Cemetery in March 1920 by the 84th Labour Company and he was reburied in the Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery at Aubers Ridge.

Written by

John Fraser

Royal Navy

Royal Navy, Merchant Marine Reserve.
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour, the Plymouth Naval Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 49.

The family home was at 4, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Alexander and Elsie Fraser, Leathers, Morayshire.

John Fraser was born in Morayshire. He was employed with the Allan Line of Steamers as a steward before being called up.

John was married to Flora McAllister Fraser and had one son, Ainsworth, who was born in England before the family moved to Helensburgh.

On 19th March 1918, the 'Monagua', an armed merchant cruiser, en route from Dakar to a 'Special Rendezvous' was in collision with U.S. destroyer 'Manley'. A heavy explosion followed wrecking the wireless cabin and aerial. John was one of 17 men killed.

Written by

William Pettigrew Ferguson

Royal Artillery Garrison

110th Seige Batt. Royal Garrison Artillery.
He is remembered with honour on St. Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 48.

The family home was at 42, East Princes Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Duncan and Euphemia Pettigrew Ferguson.
Siblings: William had three brothers, Duncan, Donald and Robert and two sisters, Effie and Catherine. Duncan also served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, he was killed in March, 1918.

William Ferguson was born at 178, East Princes Street and grew up in the town.

He enlisted in the Royal Garrison Artillery.

William died from being gassed at the clearing station in France. He was 24 years old.

His parents had his gravestone inscribed: ‘For liberty and truth he sacrificed his glorious youth he died for us’.

His brother Duncan was also killed in action two months earlier.

Written by

Duncan Ferguson

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3, Line 47.

he family home was at 42, East Princes Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Duncan and Euphemia Pettigrew Ferguson.
Siblings: Duncan had three brothers, William, Donald and Robert and two sisters, Effie and Catherine. William also served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and died in May, 1918.

Duncan Ferguson was born at 178, East Princes Street, where his father was a carter. He grew up in Helensburgh and was employed as a painter with Robert Carson, decorators, before joining up.

He enlisted at Dumbarton in January 1915 joining the local 9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, later fighting with the 8th and then 10th Battalions.

Duncan was killed in action at Ypres. He was 20 years old. His family had the inscription: 'He died for us', engraved on his headstone.

His brother William died, from wounds received in battle, two months later.

Written by

Arthur Leslie Hamilton

Highland Light Infantry

3rd Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Basra Memorial, Larchfield School Memorial, Glasgow School of Art and Glasgow University Rolls of Honour, St. Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 52.

The family home was at 'The Grange', Helensburgh
The son of Mr James Whitelaw Hamilton, RSA and Mrs Lilian Millar Hamilton (nee Paterson).
Siblings: Arthur had one sister, Hilda.
Arthur Hamilton was born and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a member of the Glasgow Boys group of artists and local councillor. He was educated at Larchfield Academy before entering Glasgow University School of Architecture, where he was a member of the University training corps.
He was employed by his uncle, A.N. Paterson, as an apprentice draughtsman before being commissioned into the army in 1914. Paterson also designed the Helensburgh War Memorial. A painting was commissioned from ‘Glasgow Boy’ James Guthrie, which now hangs in the Kelvingrove Museum.
Arthur died, killed in action, in Mesopotamia at the age of 26.
Written by

John Hall

Highland Light Infantry

18th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 51.

The family home was at Alexandria Street, Perth.
The son of William Hall (barman), Lorne Street, Helensburgh and Elizabeth Hall (nee Malcolm) of Alexandria Street, Perth.
Siblings: Unknown

 

John Hall was born and brought up at 34 New Row, Perth with his mother. His father lived in Helensburgh. He was employed as a footman with Lady Ogilvie at Errol Park before moving to Edinburgh where he became a postman.
He initially joined the King's Own Scottish Borderers (service No. 27041) before being transferred to the Highland Light Infantry.
John died, killed in action at Ypres. He was aged 25.
Written by

Bernard (Brine) McDonald

Argylls

2nd Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 8.

The family home was at The Barracks, James Street, Helensburgh. The son of John and Mary McDonald.
Siblings: Brine had one married sister, Mrs Gibson, living at 38, Maitland Street.

Brine McDonald was born in Helensburgh where his father was a general labourer. His parents had moved to the town from Belfast. He had previously been a professional soldier and although employed as a postman at the outbreak of war was quick to re-enlist. Brine died of influenza in a prisoner of war camp in Germany after being reported missing in action and then confirmed as captured. He died aged 34 years.
Brine left a wife, Sarah, and two small children living in Hutcheson, Glasgow.

Written by

William Duncan Inglis

Machine gun corp

Machine Gun Corps Infantry.
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 2.

The family home was at 17, West King Street, Helensburgh where he lived with his uncle, James Black.
The son of James Inglis (letter carrier) and Elizabeth Inglis (nee Duncan).

 

William Inglis was born at 57, East King Street, Helensburgh where his father was a letter carrier. He later lived with his uncle, James Black. He was employed by MacNeur and Bryden as a printer and typesetter before he enlisted. He was also a musician with the Renton Prize Band.He initially joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in 1914, service no. 4453, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps in August, 1916.
William was killed in action aged 31 years. 

Written by

George William Young

Black Watch

4th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School Memorial, the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 39.

The family home was Rockmount, 108, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh.The son of James and Laticia Lillah Young.
Siblings: George had three sisters, Margaret, Alma and Gertrude.

George Young was born in Helensburgh, attended Larchfield School and had been working in India as a tea planter when war broke out. He had connections with India as both his mother and older sister had been born in Bengal.
He returned at the outbreak of war and enlisted in the Black Watch.
Initially, he was reported as missing. Then his mother received a postcard stating her son was in a German hospital in Limburg. William died, from wounds received in battle, at the age of 36.
His family's inscription on his gravestone reads: 'In Loving Memory of George, Underneath are the everlasting arms'

Written by

William Milne Wright

RAF

Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the St. Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 38.

The family home was 21, Colquhoun Square, Helensburgh. The son of Annie Wright
Siblings: William had one younger sister, Alice.

William Wright was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. He was born at Cairndhu where his father worked as a coachman for former Glasgow Lord Provost John Ure. By 1911, his mother, Annie was head of the household and he was single and living at home, at Myrtlebank, 15 Henry Bell Street, with his younger sister. William was employed with Wm. Jack as a joiner.
He was described as a keen shot in the local territorials before enlisting in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was later commissioned into the King's Royal Rifles before moving to the Royal Flying Corps.
William died at the age of 29 in a flying accident over East Scotland. He was killed instantly.He was buried at Helensburgh Cemetery with full military honours.
Written by

John Wilson

RAF

142 Squadron, Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 37.

The family home was Bath Cottage, 127, Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of the late Charles Wilson and Jeanie Wilson
Siblings: John had five brothers, Charles, Colin, David, William and Robert, and one sister, Elizabeth. Colin served as a sergeant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was badly wounded. David served in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and died in July 1918. Robert served as a Lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade and became a prisoner of war in Germany.

John Wilson was born and brought up in Helensburgh. On leaving school he was employed as a watchmaker in the town.
John enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (service no. 100842) at the outbreak of war, transferring to the Royal Air Force as a Trade Instrument Repairer.
John was transferred by ambulance to the Palestine Hospital with 'Inflammation of the right leg'. Later, he died of Malarial Fever. He was 36 years old.
His mother had his gravestone inscribed: ‘Faithful unto death’.

Written by

David Wilson

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Soissons Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 36.

The family home was Bath Cottage, 127, Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of the late Charles Wilson and Jeanie Wilson
Siblings:  David had five brothers, Charles, Colin, John, William and Robert, and one sister, Elizabeth. His brother, Colin served as a sergeant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was badly wounded. Brother John served in the Royal Air Force and died in October 1918. Brother Robert served as a Lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade and became a prisoner of war in Germany.

David Wilson was born and brought up in Helensburgh. On leaving school he was employed as a bank clerk with the Bank of Scotland in the town.
David was reported as wounded in September 1917 and again in May 1918.
He was reported as missing in July 1918 and later confirmed dead, killed in action, on that date. He was 25 years old.
His remains were not recovered.
Written by

John A.B. Rae

Royal navy division

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
He is remembered with honour on the St Columba’s Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 26.

The family home was Fell End, Lee Hall, Pinch Me Near, Bellingham, Northumberland.The son of Thomas and Isabella Rae.
Siblings: John had at least one older brother, Peter, who served and survived. The Lych Gate to Bellingham cemetery records the fallen and those who served. Both brothers are named along with an A. Rae, but it is unknown if he is a sibling.

John Rae worked as a Clerk on the North British Railway and, although not a native of the town, he was working at Helensburgh Station. A report in the Helensburgh and Gareloch Times reports him joining the Royal Naval Division.

John served with the 63rd Naval Division, Hawke Battalion. He was gassed and eventually invalided out from the Navy. He died at home in Bellingham, Northumberland of TB, caused by gassing. He was 24 years of age.

He is buried in a family grave with his parents at Bellingham. In 2010, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission erected a CWGC headstone. John Rae is remembered in his adopted town on the Helensburgh Roll of Honour and is also honoured on the St Columba’s Church memorial.

Written by

Ian Ure

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School Roll of Honour, Loretto College Roll of Honour, the Congregational Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 25.

The family home was Rockbank, 142, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of John Gibb Ure (flour merchant) and Agnes Ross Ure (nee Auld).
Siblings: Ian had one younger sister, Marjorie.

Ian Ure was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a flour merchant in the family business Messrs. John Ure and Sons. His grandfather was Glasgow Lord Provost John Ure and his uncle Lord Strathclyde. He was educated at Larchfield School and then at Loretto College in Edinburgh. There he was a prefect and played rugby, hockey and cricket. He then became a partner in his father’s business.
He married Elizabeth Winifred Arrol of Torwoodhill, Rhu. He had served in the Argyll Territorials and rose to the rank of Captain. He was on the reserve officer’s list at the outbreak of war and was commissioned. He served in France as Company Commander of the 6th Batt., notably at Vimy Ridge. Later, fighting in Italy in December 1917, he was awarded the Military Cross 'For distinguished service in the field'.
Ian was 32 years old when he died of injuries when a bomb accidentally exploded. At the time of his death, he was resident at 77, St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. His gravestone is inscribed: ‘Beloved son of John G. Ure and deary loved husband of Winifred Ure’.

Written by

William Thomson

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Congregational Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 34.

The family home was 31, West Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of Thomas and Jane Thompson, 129, Ward Street, Kalgoorie, Western Australia.
Siblings:  William had one older brother, Samuel, and two older sisters.

 William Thomson was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a baker. On leaving school, William followed his father into the trade. At some point the family emigrated to Australia and it is not known whether William remained in Scotland with relatives or returned to enlist.
He enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and served as a stretcher bearer.
William died, killed in action, at Arras at the age of 22. His remains were not recovered.

Written by

George Edwin Thomson

RAF

Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Allan Glen’s School Book of Remembrance, University of Glasgow Roll of Honour, St Michaels and All Angels memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 33.

The family home was Glenfuelan, Millig Street, Helensburgh. The son of James and Ellen Thomson
Siblings: George was an only son. 

George Thomson was born in Rangoon, Burma where his father worked. Moving to Helensburgh, he was educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School, Allan Glens School in Glasgow and Glenalmond School in Perthshire before going to Glasgow University, studying for the civil service. He was a member of the local swimming club and played rugby.
George was commissioned into the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, directly from University, before joining the R.A.F. During his time in France, he brought down 21 German planes. Fighting against the famous Red Baron over Ypres. He received the Military Cross and the Distinguished Service Order, both for 'Conspicuous Gallantry and Devotion to Duty'.
George died, when his plane burst into flames and crashed, at Port Meadow, Wolvercote after refuelling. He was 21 years old. 

Written by

Edward Sweeney

Black Watch

8th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 32.

The family home was 9, John Street, Helensburgh The son of James Sweeney (gardener) and Bridget Sweeney.
Siblings: Edward had 2 brothers, James and Charles and a sister, Sarah.

 

Edward Sweeney was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a gardener. He followed his father’s profession by becoming a gardener to Mr Kidston of Rosebank.
It is believed that Edward originally joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and then transferred to the Black Watch.
Edward died, killed in action, at Hill 41 in Belgium. He was 26 years old.
His name was put forward for the Memorial by his sister, Sarah, who was still living at 11 Colquhoun Square in the town.
His brother James, residing at 34 Blyth Road, West Kensington, London, sent the inscription for his headstone, which read: 'Gone But Not Forgotten'. 

Written by

Alexander Leitch Stewart

Argylls

7th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on Arras Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School Memorial, St Andrew’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 31.

The family home was Braeburn, 58 Campbell Street, Helensburgh. The son of Thomas and Elizabeth Stewart.
Siblings: Alexander had two brothers, Archibald and John, and two sisters, Agnes and Annie..

 

Alexander Stewart was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a housebuilder and factor. He was one of twins with brother John. He was educated at Larchfield School and went on to become an apprentice joiner. He enjoyed rugby and cricket.
Alexander firstly joined the 9th Batt. of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, later transferring to the 7th Batt. Alexander died, killed in action, at Arras. He was 26 years of age. His remains were not recovered.
Written by

Bruce Carstairs Spy

Cameronians

10th Batt. Cameron Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the St Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 30.

The family home was 12, Glennan Gardens, Helensburgh The son of the late Robert and Mrs Margaret Spy
Siblings: Bruce had two brothers, Andrew and Robert, and three sisters, Jasemina, Louise and Jean.

Bruce Spiers

Bruce Spy was born in Helensburgh and educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School. He was employed with his brother, Andrew Spy, Coal Merchants, in the town before joining up.

He enlisted in the 3rd Batt. Scottish Horse in August 1915, serving in Gallipoli and Egypt before transferring to the Cameron Highlanders and serving in Serbia. He received the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field and the Cross of Kara-Georg (2nd class), given by the King of Serbia for distinguished service.

After being discharged due to a wound in his foot, Bruce died at home from malaria, influenza and pneumonia. He is buried in Rhu Churchyard.

Written by

Cornelius (Con) Sharkey

Argylls

1/6th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St. Joseph's Church Roll of Honour, St Michael and All Angels Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 29.

The family home was at 27, Maitland Street, Helensburgh The son of Patrick Sharkey (labourer) and Margaret Sharkey (nee Foley). 
Siblings: Con had two younger brothers, Patrick and Peter, and three sisters, Annie, Margaret and Mary.
Con Sharkey was born at Alma Place in Helensburgh, where his father was a labourer. In 1911, the census shows him living at home at 27, Maitland Street. He was employed as a laundry van man. He married Alice McKechnie (domestic servant), in January 1913, and resided at 50, East Princes Street where they were bringing up two young sons.
Con died, killed in action with a gunshot wound to the back, at the Somme.
He was 33 years of age.
Written by

William Russell

Royal Flying Corp

Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Larchfield School Memorial, Fettes College Roll of Honour, St. Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 28.

The family home was at Ardluss, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh The son of William and Jane (nee Cannan) Russell.
Siblings: William was the middle son of triplets. John was older and George younger. William was one of five sons including James and Tom, all serving at the front, and one sister, Marion, who was nursing in France.
William Russell was born in Kirkcudbrightshire, one of triplets. Unfortunately, his mother died 3 days later. The family moved to Helensburgh where his father was the factor for Luss Estates. William was educated at Larchfield and Fettes College where he was Captain of the Fives X 1912/13 and the West of Scotland Football Team 1913-14.
William joined the Royal Engineers and then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps after being wounded in the leg whilst acting as an observer. Later taking his pilot’s certificate.
William was flying a De Havilland 4 aircraft on a ferry flight, just three days after the new Royal Air Force was formed by amalgamating the RFC and RNAS. The aircraft stalled and crashed to the ground. He was 23 years of age.
His gravestone reads ‘OF HELENSBURGH, SCOTLAND’.
Written by

Harold R. Robinson

Royal Garrison Artillery

10th Siege Baty. Royal Garrison Artillery
He is remembered with honour on the Le Touret Memorial, the Glasgow Academy Internal WW1 Board, St. Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 27.

The family home was Durie House, 4 Abercromby Street, Helensburgh The son of the Rev. Alexander Robinson and Marion Robinson.
Siblings: Harold had two sisters, Barbara and Mary, and one brother Nigel.
Harold Robinson was born in Partick and brought up in Crieff, where his father had a ministry. The family then moved to Helensburgh following his father’s appointment as minister at Kilmun.
Harold attended Glasgow Academy before entering the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, as a 'gentleman cadet'. He joined the Royal Garrison Artillery in 1914.
Harold died, killed in action, at the age of 20 years.
Written by

Alan Hope Smith Nicholl

Artillery

Royal Field Artillery
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, Larchfield School memorial, Sebergh School Cloisters, at the Old Parish Church and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 25.

The family home was 15, Havelock Street, Helensburgh The son of Charles and Christina Nicholl (nee Morrison).
Siblings: Alan had two older brothers, Charles and John, and two sisters, Noel and Mary.
 Alan Nicholl was born at 15, Havelock Street in Helensburgh where his father was a Clerk (mercantile). He was educated at Larchfield School Memorial and Sedbergh School in Cumbria and entered the Royal Field Artillery as a gunner.
He was promoted to Second Lieutenant in the 24th Batt.
Alan died, killed in action, at Arras. He was 19 years old. His remains were not recovered.
Written by

Vincent McDowall McSkimming

Highland Light Infantry

18th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Park Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 23.

The family home was 61, East Princes Street, Helensburgh The son of Vincent D. and Sarah McSkimming
Siblings: Vincent has three sisters, Sarah, Alice, and Mary. His brother, James, served as a sergeant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and received the Military Medal after being gassed.
Vincent McSkimming was born in Dumbarton where his father was a plater in the shipbuilding industry. He moved to Helensburgh to the employment of Mr Snodgrass at Millig Farm. Vincent died, from wounds received in battle, at Ypres. He was 19 years of age.
His gravestone reads ‘To memory ever dear’.
Written by

Andrew McNair

royal Garrison Artillery

Royal Garrison Artillery
He is remembered with honour on the St. Joseph's Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 22.

The family home was 38, Grant Street, Helensburgh The son of James McNair (gardener) and Mary McNair. 
Siblings: Andrew had two sisters, Janet and Helen, and one brother, John.
Andrew McNair was born and brought up in Helensburgh were his father was a ship’s fireman. He was employed as a carpenter with Messrs Osborne, carriers, before enlisting. He joined the Scottish Rifles and was then transferred to the 375th Siege Batt. of the Royal Garrison Artillery.
Andrew married Sarah (nee McMeny), a munitions worker in Gourock. They had been married less than a year when Andrew died, killed in action.
He was 21 years of age.
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Archibald McKillop

Royal Engineers

93rd Field Coy., Royal Engineers
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, the Helensburgh Post Office Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 18.

The family home was 67, East Princes Street, Helensburgh.The son of Archibald and Jane McKillop.
Siblings: Archibald had four brothers, James, Abraham, John and David and four sisters, Kate, Lizzie, Jane and Annie. His brother Abraham died in the war

Archibald McKillop was born in Helensburgh where his father worked as a coachman. On leaving school, he joined the Black Watch and served in South Africa and India, receiving medals and clasps. He was a gymnastics instructor.
On leaving the service he worked as a telephone engineer. Marrying Margaret and having a son Archibald.
At the outbreak of WW1 Archibald joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was later transferred to the Royal Engineers. He died, from sniper fire, at Arras leaving a wife and 9 year old son. He was 41 years old.

 

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Hugh McKellar

Gordon highlanders

1st Batt. Gordon Highlanders He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 19.

The family home was Camis Eskan Cottage, Helensburgh.The son of the late Hugh McKellar and Mrs Annie McKellar.
Siblings: Hugh had three brothers, Archibald, Hector and John and two sisters, Annie and Ann. Archibald was also killed in June 1918.
Hugh McKellar was born in Helensburgh where his father worked as a shepherd at Drumfork Farm. He was educated at the Clyde Street School.
Hugh followed his older brother into the Gordon Highlanders in March 1918. He was posted to France in September, 1918 and died, killed in action, only one month later.
Written by

Archibald McKellar

Gordon highlanders

Gordon Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 19.

The family home was Camis Eskan Cottage, Helensburgh. The son of the late Mr McKellar and Mrs Annie McKellar
Siblings: Archibald had three brothers, Hugh, Hector and John and two sisters, Ann and Annie. Hugh also died, killed in action in September, 1918.
 Archibald McKellar was born in Helensburgh where his father worked as a shepherd at Drumfork Farm. He attended the Clyde Street School.
Archibald had enlisted only 10 days before his death from pneumonia during training at Galashiels. He was 19 years of age. After a service at the Helensburgh Parish Church he was buried at Helensburgh Cemetery.
Written by

John McKechnie

HLI

1/7th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 20.

The family home was 39, Grant Street, Helensburgh. The son of William and Bridget McKechnie.
Siblings: John had three older siblings (all had left home by the beginning of the war).  
John McKechnie was born in Row (Rhu) where his father was a fish curer.
He was employed as a fish salesman before enlisting in the Highland Light Infantry.
John died at the Somme, after being wounded in the chest in battle. He was operated on at the Australian Hospital but died 9 days later from bronchial pneumonia. He was 27 years of age.
Written by

Gilbert McInnes

South African Infantry Brigade

12th Batt. South African Infantry Brigade
He is remembered with honour on the Menin Gate Memorial, Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 15.

The family home was at 21, East Princes Street, Helensburgh The son of Robert McInnes of Helensburgh and Mary McInnes of 21, Ashbridge Avenue, Toronto. 
Siblings: It was reported that Gilbert had four brothers serving in the forces. Duncan, with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, also died. The others, James, David and Arthur survived the war. He also had a sister, Margaret. 

Gilbert McInnes was born and brought up in 92 West Clyde Street in Helensburgh. His mother later emigrated to Canada.

He was employed with Wm Dow, Grocers before moving to South Africa.

He joined the South African Infantry and returned to fight for his country.

Gilbert was first reported as missing in action on 17th April, 1918 and in  December, confirmed killed at that date. He was 25 years of age.

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Duncan McInnes

Argylls

11th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Park Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 14.

The family home was at 21, East Princes Street, Helensburgh The son of Robert McInnes of Helensburgh and Mary McInnes of 21, Ashbridge Avenue, Toronto. 
Siblings: It was reported that Duncan had four brothers serving in the forces. Gilbert served with the South African Contingent and was also killed. The others, James, David and Arthur survived the war. He also had a sister, Margaret. 

Duncan McInnes was born and brought up in 92 West Clyde Street in Helensburgh. His mother later emigrated to Canada. He was employed with Mr Robert Murray as a fishmonger before enlisting.

He married Jean Strachan and had three children bringing them at Windsor Terrace, 21 East Princes Street at the time of his death.

Duncan died of wounds received in battle at the 63rd Clearing Station, France. He was 32 years of age.

Written by

Alexander Anderson Milne

Royal Army Medical Corps

Royal Army Medical Corps - 31st Lowland Field Ambulance
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Helensburgh Post Office Memorial, Helensburgh Baptist Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 24.

The family home was at 38, James Street, Helensburgh The son of George Rose Milne and Elizabeth Chalmers Milne of Monifieth. 
Alexander Milne was born in Monifieth and later came to Helensburgh to work for the Post Office. He was married to Joan, and had three children, Jane, George and Elizabeth, the latter born in 1915.
He enlisted at Yorkhill in April, 1915. He was deployed to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and served in the Sanitary Section before joining the South Midlands Field Ambulance. He was hospitalised a number of times with influenza, and renal colic before succumbing to malaria and dysentery at the 17th Military Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt aged 40 years.
He was awarded the 1915 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His wife, Joan, received a pension of £1 9s. 7d. per week
Written by

John B. McIlvane (McIlvaine)

Sherwood Foresters

2/7th Batt. The Sherwood Foresters
He is remembered with honour on Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton, St Joseph’s Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 16

The family home was The son of William and Eleanor McIlvaine.

glenartcasleteFather McIlvaine was educated locally, and after training as a priest acted for several years as a senior assistant at Glasgow's St Andrew's Cathedral until 1916. He was among one of the first of Glasgow's Catholic priests to join the Army serving as Chaplain 4th Class. He served in France and had returned to Glasgow to recover from the effects of a gas attack. Father McIlvaine died, drowned at sea, when the hospital ship Glenart Castle was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Bristol Channel.
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