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William Milne Wright

RAF

Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the St. Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 38.

The family home was 21, Colquhoun Square, Helensburgh. The son of Annie Wright
Siblings: William had one younger sister, Alice.

William Wright was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. He was born at Cairndhu where his father worked as a coachman for former Glasgow Lord Provost John Ure. By 1911, his mother, Annie was head of the household and he was single and living at home, at Myrtlebank, 15 Henry Bell Street, with his younger sister. William was employed with Wm. Jack as a joiner.
He was described as a keen shot in the local territorials before enlisting in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was later commissioned into the King's Royal Rifles before moving to the Royal Flying Corps.
William died at the age of 29 in a flying accident over East Scotland. He was killed instantly.He was buried at Helensburgh Cemetery with full military honours.

John Wilson

RAF

142 Squadron, Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 37.

The family home was Bath Cottage, 127, Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of the late Charles Wilson and Jeanie Wilson
Siblings: John had five brothers, Charles, Colin, David, William and Robert, and one sister, Elizabeth. Colin served as a sergeant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was badly wounded. David served in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and died in July 1918. Robert served as a Lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade and became a prisoner of war in Germany.

John Wilson was born and brought up in Helensburgh. On leaving school he was employed as a watchmaker in the town.
John enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (service no. 100842) at the outbreak of war, transferring to the Royal Air Force as a Trade Instrument Repairer.
John was transferred by ambulance to the Palestine Hospital with 'Inflammation of the right leg'. Later, he died of Malarial Fever. He was 36 years old.
His mother had his gravestone inscribed: ‘Faithful unto death’.

David Wilson

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Soissons Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 36.

The family home was Bath Cottage, 127, Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of the late Charles Wilson and Jeanie Wilson
Siblings:  David had five brothers, Charles, Colin, John, William and Robert, and one sister, Elizabeth. His brother, Colin served as a sergeant in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was badly wounded. Brother John served in the Royal Air Force and died in October 1918. Brother Robert served as a Lieutenant in the Rifle Brigade and became a prisoner of war in Germany.

David Wilson was born and brought up in Helensburgh. On leaving school he was employed as a bank clerk with the Bank of Scotland in the town.
David was reported as wounded in September 1917 and again in May 1918.
He was reported as missing in July 1918 and later confirmed dead, killed in action, on that date. He was 25 years old.
His remains were not recovered.

James Alistair White

29th canadian infantry

29th Batt. Canadian Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Vimy Memorial, the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 24.

The family home was 122, East Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of Lewis White (gardener) and Mary White
Siblings:  James had two sisters, Mary and Elizabeth.

James White was brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a gardener. He followed his father's trade and on leaving school became a gardener at Moorpark, Cardross before emigrating to Canada. He married Catherine White and lived at 330, 8th Avenue East, Vancouver, where they were bringing up two children.
He enlisted in the Canadian Infantry to return and fight for his country. James died, killed in action, at Vimy Ridge. He was 33 years old.
His remains were not recovered

Patrick Welsh

Royal Inniskillen Fusiliers

Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on St Joseph’s Church Memorial (Walsh), and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 23..

 



  

Patrick Welsh has been difficult to trace with certainty. The family home was Belfast?
His entry in the Helensburgh Roll of Honour identifies Private Patrick Welsh, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died April 1916. He is recorded on the cenotaph as Private Patrick Welsh, but a Patrick Walsh is named on the St Joseph’s memorial plaque.
The only Patrick Welsh / Walsh of the RIF who died in April 1916 served as a Lance Corporal in the 7th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and died fighting at Loos. His next of kin is a Mrs M Wylie of Falls Road, Belfast.
Local newspaper reports say Patrick was wounded first in June 1915 and then again on the 21st February 1916, and that he had died in April that year.

Harry Webster

Royal Navy

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Chatham Naval Memorial, St Bride’s Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 34.

The family home was 2, Lorne Street, Helensburgh. The son of Alexander Webster of Cupar and Catherine Webster of Lorne Street, Helensburgh

 Harry Webster was born in Cupar, Fife and at some point moved to Helensburgh. In 1911, he was boarding at 14, West Clyde Street and was employed as a coach painter.
In 1912, he married Catherine Cathbert, of 2, Lorne Street and the couple, with their young daughter, lived with her parents.
Harry joined the Royal Navy as a painter 2nd Class in 1915 and was posted to HMS Vanguard. Having survived the Battle of Jutland, he was killed in an explosion on board aged 29.
His medal entitlement was issued to his widow in 1919 with the words: 'Died on Active Duty'.

James Henry Digby Watson

Royal Navy

Royal Navy
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Chatham Naval Memorial, King’s School memorial, Edinburgh Academy memorial, the RFU Memorial at Twickenham, St Michaels and All Angels memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 5.

The family home was Westwood, Helensburgh. The son of Captain J.H. Watson RN and Mrs E.V. Watson.
Siblings:  Digby was an only son with one sister, Greta.

 James (known as Digby) was born in Helensburgh, where his father was an Engineer Captain in the Royal Navy.
He studied at King's School Canterbury, Edinburgh Academy and then for a M.A. at Edinburgh University where he played rugby for the 1st XV, as well as winning the middleweight boxing championship and winning the long jump each year. He joined the Royal Navy as a surgeon and was posted to HMS Hawke, he died when HMS Hawke was torpedoed. Digby was 24 years old when lost at sea.
The submarine’s first torpedo hit HMS Hawke, igniting a magazine and causing a tremendous explosion, which ripped much of the ship apart. Hawke sank in a few minutes with the loss of her Commander and 523 men.

John Rae

Royal navy division

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
He is remembered with honour on the St Columba’s Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 26.

The family home was Fell End, Lee Hall, Pinch Me Near, Bellingham, Northumberland.The son of Thomas and Isabella Rae.
Siblings: John had at least one older brother, Peter, who served and survived. The Lych Gate to Bellingham cemetery records the fallen and those who served. Both brothers are named along with an A. Rae, but it is unknown if he is a sibling.

John Rae worked as a Clerk on the North British Railway and, although not a native of the town, he was working at Helensburgh Station. A report in the Helensburgh and Gareloch Times reports him joining the Royal Naval Division.

John served with the 63rd Naval Division, Hawke Battalion. He was gassed and eventually invalided out from the Navy. He died at home in Bellingham, Northumberland of TB, caused by gassing. He was 24 years of age.

He is buried in a family grave with his parents at Bellingham. In 2010, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission erected a CWGC headstone. John Rae is remembered in his adopted town on the Helensburgh Roll of Honour and is also honoured on the St Columba’s Church memorial.

William Wallace Easton

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Old Parish Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 42.

The family home was at 37, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh
The son of William Wallace Easton F.S.Sc. and Mrs Mary Dixton Easton (nee McChristie).
Siblings: William had three sisters, Mary, Connie and Millie.

William Easton was born in the family home (and dental consulting rooms) at 37 Sinclair Street, Helensburgh, where his father was a dental surgeon. 

William first enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in 1914 at the age of 15. Later he was attached to the Seaforth Highlanders, (Service no. 235395).
William was wounded at the battle of Bapaume and was discharged from the Perth Depot on 1st September, 1919. He died 4 days later from an infection.
He was buried at Helensburgh Cemetery aged 20 years. He was awarded the Silver War Badge, B293464. 

Herbert Brinn Brown

Argylls

1/9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Columba’s Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 11.

His family home was at East Thorn, 14 Adelaide Street, Helensburgh.
The son of James and Charlotte (nee Brinn) Brown.
Siblings:  His brothers Stanley and David both served during the war. Pictured here, Herbert is seated.

Herbert Brown was born at 72, East Princes Street in Helensburgh and was educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School. His father, James, was a local fishmonger.

He trained as a banker with the local branch of the Bank of Scotland, later transferring to Perth and then to Glasgow head office.

Herbert was a keen athlete and served as secretary of both the local amateur rowing club and the swimming club.

Herbert was badly wounded at the Battle of Ypres and died of his wounds in hospital in Boulogne. He was 29 years of age.

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