1919

1919 (11)

These are the stories behind those who fell between 1919-20

Written by

James Armstrong

Argylls

4th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders then transferred to the Labour Corps. He is remembered with honour on Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 41.

The family home was 6, East King Street, Helensburgh. The son of Thomas and Mary McGaffney Armstrong.
Siblings: Unknown.

James Armstrong was born and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a gardener.

He joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was later transferred to the Labour Corps, possibly after being wounded.

James died at Ypres. He was 19 years old.

Written by

William Wallace Easton

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Old Parish Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 42.

The family home was at 37, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh
The son of William Wallace Easton F.S.Sc. and Mrs Mary Dixton Easton (nee McChristie).
Siblings: William had three sisters, Mary, Connie and Millie.

William Easton was born in the family home (and dental consulting rooms) at 37 Sinclair Street, Helensburgh, where his father was a dental surgeon. 

William first enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in 1914 at the age of 15. Later he was attached to the Seaforth Highlanders, (Service no. 235395).
William was wounded at the battle of Bapaume and was discharged from the Perth Depot on 1st September, 1919. He died 4 days later from an infection.
He was buried at Helensburgh Cemetery aged 20 years. He was awarded the Silver War Badge, B293464. 

Written by

Donald MacDonald

Argylls

1/8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Congregational Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 44.

The family home was at 9, West King Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Donald and Betsy MacDonald.
Siblings:  Donald had two older brothers, Archibald and James who both served and survived the war, and two younger siblings Mary and Allan.

Donald MacDonald was born in Helensburgh, the son of a gardener working at Row House. He enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders at the age of 17. Donald was wounded in 1917 and then wounded again in October 1918. He died from his wounds at the Whipps Cross Military Hospital, London, in February, 1919. He was aged 22. Donald is buried at Helensburgh Cemetery.

Written by

Edward McCormick

Argylls

8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 43.

The family home was at 37, East Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of Bernard and Sarah Fisher McCormick. Siblings: Edward had an older sister, Mary Ann, and a younger brother, Barny.
Edward McCormick appears in the 1901 census as a boarder, aged 8, at 97, West Princes Street, along with an older sister Mary Ann and a younger brother, Barny. In the 1911 census, he is a boarder, aged 19, at 37, East King Street. Employed at that time as an apprentice painter with Mr M McPherson, Colquhoun Square.
He joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders early in 1914 and later was transferred to the 91st Labour Corps. He survived the fighting.
At the time of his death, he had just been demobbed 4 weeks before. He died at the Cottage Hospital of pneumonia. It was reported that his landlady also died of the same.
Written by

Allan S. McLachlan

Royal Scots

2nd Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on Park Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 45.

The family home was 47, Grant Street, Helensburgh.The son of Janet McLachlan (widow).
Siblings: Allan had an older brother, David.
 Allan McLachlan was born and brought up in Helensburgh where his mother was widowed.
On leaving school he was a butcher’s message boy before working with Messrs Wm. Thom and Son, slaters, and then enlisting.
Although we have no reports, we can surmise that he was captured in battle, and was taken prisoner of war. He died of pneumonia at the Military Hospital, Hillden, near Cologne at the age of 24 years.
Written by

Robert Neil (Neill)

Argylls

10th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 36.

The family home was 10, Glenfinlas Street, Helensburgh. The son of Claude and Margaret Neill.
Siblings: Robert was one of five children. His older brother Alexander, and his two younger brothers Thomas and George all served during the war and survived. He had one sister, Annie.
Robert Neill was born in Shandon where his father was a coachman (omnibus). He was employed as an under-gardener by Mrs Young at Rockmount, Helensburgh before enlisting in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.
Robert was severely wounded at the Battle of Cambrai but survived. He was to die, post war, at the Military Hospital in Lincoln from heart trouble at the age of 25.
His body was returned to his family for burial.
Written by

George Hair Ronald

Royal Engineers

17th Div. Signals Coy., Royal Engineers
He is remembered with honour on the Delhi Memorial (India Gate) and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 47.

The family home was 85, Dundas Street, Tradeston, Glasgow The son of George A. Ronald
George Ronald was born in Dumfries and was brought up in Glasgow. On leaving school he was employed as a commercial salesman in oil and tallow. Later being employed in the telephone service of the Glasgow Post Office.
George was married to Elizabeth, who later moved to 1, West King Street in the town.
George joined the local territorials in 1914, later joining the Royal Engineers. He served at Gallipoli before being sent to India. He died of sunstroke, aged 42.
Written by

William Smith Sinclair MB, CM, DPH.

Royal army medical corp

New Zealand Army Medical Corps
He is remembered with honour on the New Zealand National War Memorial, Canterbury Provincial Memorial, Christchurch, New Zealand, the University of Glasgow Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 48.

The family home was Lorne House, 108, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Charles Stewart and Agnes Sillars.
Although described as a Major on the Helensburgh War Memorial, William Sinclair had been promoted to Captain shortly before his death.

William Sinclair was born in Helensburgh and after being educated at Larchfield School, he trained as a Doctor at Glasgow University.

He took up practice, firstly in Wigan, and then in St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. He married May Yuile Duncan and had one son, Keith, before moving, alone, to New Zealand in 1908. His wife was granted a divorce in 1913.

William returned with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, serving in Egypt 1914-15 and on the Western Front 1918-19. He was returning to New Zealand on a troop ship, when taken ill. He died of heart failure following an epileptic seizure. An illness he had suffered from all his life.

Written by

Frederick C. Smith

Scottish Rifles

1st Batt. Scottish Rifles Cameronians
He is remembered with honour on Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 20.

The family home was 73, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Alfred and Esther Smith of St. John's, Poplar Avenue, Bishopton.
Siblings: Frederick had one brother, Albert and two sisters, Margaret and Mabel.
He died at the Somme, at the age of 36 and was originally buried at Dury Hospital Military Cemetery, before being moved to Villers Bretonneux after the Armistice.
His younger brother, Albert, also died at the Somme in July 1916.
Their names were added to the memorial by their sister, Margaret, who was employed as a cashier in Helensburgh.
Written by

James McEwan Sutherland

Argylls

7th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Michael and All Angels Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 50.

The family home was 7, Giffnock Gardens, Henry Bell Street, Helensburgh The son of the late Robert (badge porter) and Janet Sutherland (nee Cummings), (both deceased).
Siblings: James had a younger brother, Moses.

 

James Sutherland was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a badge porter. He was apprenticed to Wm. Shields & Co., family grocer, before being employed by Mr John Mitchell, Charing Cross.
James married Agnes Wilson, a certificated nurse, and had one daughter, Elizabeth born in September of 1915.
James was wounded in battle in October, 1918 and return to England. He died there in January, 1919 at the age of 34. His remains were returned to Helensburgh for burial.