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Thomas McGinlay

Iniskilling Fusiliers

1st Batt. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the St Joseph’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 10.

The family home was Not known. The son of Unknown.
Siblings: His obituary mentions three brothers, Neil, Michael and Hugh..

Thomas McGinlay was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town with his three brothers.

He was employed by Mr Turnbull at the Helensburgh Golf Course before enlisting in the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. Later transferring to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

Thomas died from wounds received in battle at a Casualty Clearing Station in France. He was 28 years of age.

He was employed by Mr Turnbull at the Helensburgh Golf Course before enlisting in the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. Later transferring to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. 

Thomas died from wounds received in battle at a Casualty Clearing Station in France. He was 28 years of age.

John McFarlane

royal artillery

14th Reserve Battery, Royal Field Artillery. He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial Column 1 Line 22.

The family home was at 90, West King Street, Helensburgh. The son of Isabella McFarlane (widow).
Siblings: John had one brother, Neil and two sisters, Jean and Effie.
John McFarlane was born in Alexandria and was brought up in Helensburgh by his widowed mother.
Before enlisting he was employed as an apprentice joiner in the town.
He died, killed in action at the age of 19.

George McGeachy

Argylls

1/9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Menin Gate Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 1 Line 23.

 

The family home was at 412, Dumbarton Road, Dalmuir. The son of John and Agnes McGeachy.
Siblings: George had one brother, David.

George McGeachy was born in Helensburgh and later moved to Dalmuir with his family.

He later moved again to Killearn Terrace, Springburn with his brother David, a railway engine driver. He was employed as an engine stoker on the railways before he enlisted.

George was killed in action at Ypres at the age of 24. His remains were not recovered.

Peter McFarlane

Machine gun corp

52nd Batt. Machine Gun Corps He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial Column 4 Line 12.

The family home was at 124, Glenfinlas Street, Helensburgh. The son of Peter and Mary McFarlane. Siblings: Peter had one sister, Helen.
Peter McFarlane was born in Bonhill and was brought up in Helensburgh by his widowed mother and his sister Helen.
Before enlisting he was employed as a cashier at the Steel Works.
He died, killed in action, at the age of 36.

William McDougall

Argylls

1/8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 2 Line 9.

The family home was at Back Cottage, 55, West King Street and later at 53, James Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Dugald and Annie Morton Thomson McDougall.
Siblings: John, Jennet, Dugald, Robert, Annie and Marion. John, his older brother, also died in the war. Dugald and Robert did not serve.
William McDougall was born and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a domestic gardener.
He was employed as a gardener with the Donaldson Family at Blairvadach House before enlisting in September, 1914.
William was first reported missing in action and it was later confirmed that he had died in battle. He was aged 27 years. His remains were not recovered.

John (Morton Thomson) McDougall - served as John Thomson

Machine Gun Corp

Clyde Royal Garrison Artillery and then 14th Light Armoured Motor Battery of the Machine Gun Corps
He is remembered with honour on
The Basra War Memorial (Thomson), the Scottish National War Memorial (Thompson), the Old Parish Church and Helensburgh War Memorial as McDougall, Column 4 Line 11.

The family home was at Alma Place, Helensburgh. The son of Lawrence and Mary Burns.
Siblings: William, Jennet, Dugald, Robert, Annie and Marion. William, his younger brother, also died in the war. Dugald and Robert were too young to go to war.
John McDougall gave up his apprenticeship as a gardener to the Johnson family at Rhu Arden, Upper Sutherland Crescent in the town to join the Clyde Royal Garrison Artillery in 1912. He was posted to the RGA Battery at Portkil, Kilcreggan in August 1914. A year later John was listed as a deserter. John was not really a deserter, he wrote later that he felt he was not contributing enough to the war effort and decided to join the Motor Machine Gun Service (part of the Royal Artillery) under the name of Thomson, his mother's maiden name.
John died at the Battle of Sharqat only three days before the end of the war in Mesopotamia. He was awarded the DCM, the citation reads: 'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Huwaish on the 27th October, 1918. When his armoured car received a direct hit and was stopped, he jumped out, and under very heavy fire at close range tried to start the engine again'.
John also received the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. Pictured above (left) with his brother William.

Francis (Frank) McClymont

Gordons

1st Batt. Gordon Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 6.

The family home was at 33, Grant Street, and later 50 East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of Peter and Agnes McClymont.
Siblings: Frank had an older brother, William and three sisters, Mary, Sarah and Isabella.

Frank McClymont was born and brought up in Helensburgh, the youngest of five children, where his father was a mason’s labourer. His parents came to the town from Stranraer.

He had previously served in the army before going to Canada. At the outbreak of war, he returned to re-enlist.

Frank died at Flanders, killed in action, having also been gassed in a previous battle. He was 31 years old.

Frank left a wife, Agnes Wardrop Hamilton, and two small children in Troon.

Edward McCormick

Argylls

8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 43.

The family home was at 37, East Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of Bernard and Sarah Fisher McCormick. Siblings: Edward had an older sister, Mary Ann, and a younger brother, Barny.
Edward McCormick appears in the 1901 census as a boarder, aged 8, at 97, West Princes Street, along with an older sister Mary Ann and a younger brother, Barny. In the 1911 census, he is a boarder, aged 19, at 37, East King Street. Employed at that time as an apprentice painter with Mr M McPherson, Colquhoun Square.
He joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders early in 1914 and later was transferred to the 91st Labour Corps. He survived the fighting.
At the time of his death, he had just been demobbed 4 weeks before. He died at the Cottage Hospital of pneumonia. It was reported that his landlady also died of the same.

Thomas McCready

Black Watch

1/6th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on the Loos Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 7.

The family home was at 26, Maitland Street, Helensburgh. The son of Bernard and Rose Ann McCready (nee Mundie).
Siblings: homas was the eldest of a large family of seven. Names unknown.
mccready familyThomas McCready was born and brought up in Helensburgh the eldest son of a general labourer. He was employed as a Porter at Helensburgh Central Station before enlisting.
He joined the Black Watch in July of 1917 and in March the following year was sent to France.
Just 9 days later, he was reported missing in action. Later it was confirmed that he had died, killed in action, at that date. He was 19 years of age.

James Francis Marsland

Leinster Regiment

2nd Batt. Leinster Regiment
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 28.

The family home was at Marine View, Helensburgh. The son of QMS James Marsland, a Crimean veteran and janitor of the Hermitage Higher School.
Siblings: Brothers, Lt. Fred Marsland served with the R.A.M.C. and William, who lived at Craigbank, 2, Glasgow Street and was a Prudential Insurance Agent.

James Marsland, known as Jim, grew up in an army family. His father was a Quarter Master Sergeant and veteran of the Crimea war, before becoming janitor at Hermitage Higher School. On leaving school he joined the 1st Leinsters as a professional soldier and served in South Africa receiving the South African Campaign Medal and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medals. He also served in India and spent some time in Canada. He was a drill instructor and enjoyed martial arts.

James was married to Mary and they had four children; James, Renee, Sheila and baby Florence, who was born after James’ death. At the time of her husband's death, Mary was visiting her father in Tipperary.

James was awarded the Military Cross in June 1915 for conspicuous bravery in the field. He was wounded whilst out patrolling No Man’s Land from the trenches on the Menin Road. He died at Poperinghe Casualty Clearing Station. He was 39 years old.

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