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William Stirling Donald

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Canadian Expeditionary Force
He is remembered with honour on the St. Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 37.

The family home was at 2, Prince Albert Terrace, Helensburgh. The son of Archibald Donald, master blacksmith, (deceased) and Eleanor Jemima Donald (nee Stirling).
Siblings: William came from a large family, Archibald, Margaret, Jean, Christina, Eleanor, Molly, Georgina and Agnes.

William Donald was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. After leaving school, he worked his way up to being manager of the Ironmongery Shop in Sinclair Street, Helensburgh. He was a member of the St. Columba Church where he sang in the choir. He was also a keen football player and angler.
Later, having married Jeanie Burns Donald, he emigrated to Canada where he worked as a druggist with the Edmonton Drug Co.. William returned in 1916 with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.
William died at Vimy Ridge leaving his wife and two small children, who were then living at Kilmalcolm.
The Battle of Vimy Ridge was fought in April 1917. Four divisions of the Canadian Corps captured it from the German army. It was the largest territorial advance of any Allied force at that point in the war.

James Mundie

Royal Navy

Royal Navy He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 14.

The family home was at 65, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Mr and Mrs James Mundie.
Siblings: James had a brother Private John Mundie serving with the Tyneside Scottish and reported as a prisoner of war in August, 1918. 
James Mundie was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. Before enlisting he was employed as a gardener at 'Ardvuela'.
At the outbreak of war, he joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He served on the battle cruiser, HMS Lion, which was involved in the Battle of Jutland.
It was reported that he was killed instantly by a ship's davit falling on him. This was just after the battle. He was 26 years of age.

Dennis Morgan

Argylls

2/9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 21.

The family home was at 65, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of Hugh Morgan and Elizabeth Morgan (nee Whiteford).
Siblings: Dennis had two sisters, Annie and Mary and three brothers, John, Hugh and Bernard, two of whom served with the colours and survived the war.
 Dennis Morgan was born at 67, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh and was brought up in Maitland Street, in the town, in a family of six children.
He was employed as an engine cleaner with the Railway Company before enlisting.
Dennis enlisted in October 1914 at the age of 18. He died at the Somme, killed in action. He was 21 years old.

William Chalmers Milne

Argylls

1/7th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Congregational Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 20.

The family home was at 43, West King Street, Helensburgh. The son of James Milne (mason) and Cecilia Milne.
Siblings: William had two brothers, Robert and Alexander (too young to fight), and sisters, Cecilia and Margaret.
 William Milne was born at Portsoy in Banff and moved to Helensburgh, the eldest of a family of five, where his father was a mason. It would appear that he enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders immediately on leaving school.
William died, killed by a sniper, at Arras. He was 19 years old.
The inscription on his headstone reads: 'Until He Come'.

Herbert Wardlaw Milne

74th Punjabis

74th Punjabis Indian Army
He is remembered with honour on the Neuve-Chapelle Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 29.

The family home was at Union Bank House, Colquhoun Square, Helensburgh. The son of James Milne (banker) and Elizabeth Milne (nee Warlaw).
Siblings: He had an older brother serving in the Indian Expeditionary Force and two other brothers serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps.
 Herbert Milne became a professional soldier, commissioned as 2nd Lt. in the Duke of Connaught's Own Sligo Garrison Artillery Militia in 1902 at the age of 19. He transferred to the South Staffordshire Regiment and then to the Indian Army in 1906.
He fought in the South African war and was awarded the King George's Dunbar Medal and the Queen's Medal with two clasps.
With the 74th Punjabis Indian Army, he was serving as adjutant to the 6th Batt. Cameron Highlanders. He died at Loos aged 32. His remains were not recovered. He was mentioned in dispatches, posthumously.

Alexander Anderson Milne

Royal Army Medical Corps

Royal Army Medical Corps - 31st Lowland Field Ambulance
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Helensburgh Post Office Memorial, Helensburgh Baptist Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 24.

The family home was at 38, James Street, Helensburgh The son of George Rose Milne and Elizabeth Chalmers Milne of Monifieth. 
Alexander Milne was born in Monifieth and later came to Helensburgh to work for the Post Office. He was married to Joan, and had three children, Jane, George and Elizabeth, the latter born in 1915.
He enlisted at Yorkhill in April, 1915. He was deployed to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and served in the Sanitary Section before joining the South Midlands Field Ambulance. He was hospitalised a number of times with influenza, and renal colic before succumbing to malaria and dysentery at the 17th Military Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt aged 40 years.
He was awarded the 1915 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His wife, Joan, received a pension of £1 9s. 7d. per week

John B. McIlvane (McIlvaine)

Sherwood Foresters

2/7th Batt. The Sherwood Foresters
He is remembered with honour on Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton, St Joseph’s Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 16

The family home was The son of William and Eleanor McIlvaine.

glenartcasleteFather McIlvaine was educated locally, and after training as a priest acted for several years as a senior assistant at Glasgow's St Andrew's Cathedral until 1916. He was among one of the first of Glasgow's Catholic priests to join the Army serving as Chaplain 4th Class. He served in France and had returned to Glasgow to recover from the effects of a gas attack. Father McIlvaine died, drowned at sea, when the hospital ship Glenart Castle was torpedoed by a German U-boat in the Bristol Channel.

Christopher Strang McGregor

Canadian medical corps

1st Canadian Army Medical Corps
He is remembered with honour on the Vimy Memorial, Larchfield School Memorial, St Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 8.

The family home was Bonnyton, Sutherland Street, Helensburgh. The son of John McGregor J.P. and Elizabeth McGregor.
Siblings: Christopher was one of five sons and had one sister.
Christopher McGregor was born and brought up in Helensburgh where his father was a muslin manufacturer. He attended Larchfield School and later Glasgow Academy where he graduated with an M.A. in 1896. He was a member of the University Football Team.
He was then described as a coffee planter in Vera Cruz, Mexico before returning and residing with his married sister in Helensburgh. It is believed that he then emigrated to Canada.
He enlisted in the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He died in the Military Hospital in France of pneumonia at the age of 41.

James McGhee (McGhie)

royal scots fusiliers

12th Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 9.

The family home was at Lomond Terrace, Helensburgh. The son of Unknown. 
Siblings: His brother, Daniel, had returned from America to fight and served in France.
James McGhee was born in Helensburgh and after leaving school joined the Gordon Highlanders, serving for twelve years - seven with the colours and five in reserve. He had served in the Boer War and was awarded two campaign medals.
At the outbreak of war, James was employed as a gardener at Stuckgowan, near Tarbet. He was married to Elizabeth and was bringing up two young children, James and Elizabeth.
He was conscripted to the Royal Scots Fusiliers in 1917 and sent to Egypt. He died, killed in action. He was 37 years of age.
His journey has been laid out in pdf format. Click here to view it

David McGhee

royal artillery

177th Bde. Royal Field Artillery
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial (McGee), The Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 4 Line 13.

The family home was at Row (Rhu). The son of Stewart McGhee.
Siblings: David had two brothers (unnamed) who both served during the war.
 David McGhee was born in Dumbarton and moved to Row (Rhu) where is father was a gardener. He followed his father's trade and became a gardener at Auchenault, East Abercromby Street, Helensburgh before enlisting.
David died, killed in action, at the Somme. He was 20 years old.
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