1917 (63)

These are the stories behind those who fell between 1917-18

Andrew Alexander Cameron Adam

royal scots fusiliers

13th Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers. He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, Morayshire Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 2 Line 26.

Andrew first came to Helensburgh from Morayshire as an apprentice gardener, later promoted to gardener, to Francis Henderson of Ardencaple Castle. In June 1916, he first joined the Scottish Rifles, (Service No. 20070), and then transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers.
He was married and lived in the Castle Lodge; a property attached to his employment.
The son of Andrew Mary Cameron Adam of Meadowhillocks Farm, Burghead.

Andrew died at Arras, killed by shell fire. He was 36 years old.

George Anderson

royal scots

1st Batt. and then the 3rd Batt. Royal Scots Guards
He is remembered with honour on The Menin Gate. Ypres, St Bride’s Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 27.

The family home was at 5, Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh. The son of George and Lindsay Anderson.
Siblings: George had two sisters, Marie and Christina and two brothers, Robert and David.

George Anderson was brought up in the town, where his father was a travelling draper. He was the eldest child with two brothers and two sisters who all lived at home with their parents and grandmother; Violet Lindeagle.

On the 1901 Census he was described as working as a postman with the G.P.O. By the time he joined up, George was employed at the Singer Sewing Machine Factory at Kilbowie. Clydebank. He was living in Clydebank when he enlisted.

George was reported as wounded in October 1915 but returned to the front. He died of wounds received fighting in the torrential rain at Flanders Fields on 31 July 1917. His remains were not recovered. He is remembered on the Menin Gate at Ypres. (Panel 11).

His brother Robert served with the 2nd Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Walter Bain

Argylls

9th Batt. then the 1st/7th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He is remembered with honour on the Arras War Memorial, Bay 9, St Andrews Kirk Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 36.

The family home was at 33 East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of Mr Walter a retired baker and Mrs Margaret Bain. Walter was married to Agnes Lennon Bain of 32 Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh.
Siblings: Walter had three younger sisters, Christine, Elizabeth and Margaret.

Walter Bain was born in Row (Rhu) and was brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a retired baker.  He was employed as an ironmongery warehouseman before enlisting.
At the outbreak of the war he married Agnes Lennon of 32, Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh, before being deployed to France and Flanders.
Walter was discharged on account of ill health but was recalled, serving in France from November 1916.  He was first reported missing on 25th March 1917 and then declared killed in action on that date. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Arras Memorial.

James Black

Cameron Highlanders

1st Batt. Scottish Rifles (Cameronians)
He is remembered with honour on the Tyne Cot Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 2 Line 28.

The family home was firstly at 34, Colquhoun Street where James was born, and later at 19, West King Street, Helensburgh.
The son of James and Annie Duncan Black.

Siblings: James had two brothers who both served, Peter with the Canadian Contingent, having emigrated, and David with the Motor Transport Unit. Both brothers survived the war.
James was married to Katherine (nee McFarlane) and lived at 94 West Scotland Street, Glasgow where they were bringing up their four young children.
James was killed in action in Belgium in 1917 at the age of 32.

Connell Boyce

Argylls

9th Batt. then the 10th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 29.

The family home was 24 John Street, Helensburgh The son of Connell Boyce (surfaceman for the Railway Company) and Janet Stevenson Harper Boyce.
Siblings: Three brothers, Patrick, Charles and James and three sisters, Agnes, Bridget and Elizabeth. His older brother, Charles, also fought with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in the war.

Connell (Conall) Boyce was born and grew up in Helensburgh, where his father was a surface man on the railways. He came from a large family of seven children and was educated at Clyde Street School. His father, also Connell, was born in Ireland and his mother came from Bannockburn, Stirlingshire.

Connell enlisted at the age of 17. Only two years later he lay injured on the Fields of Flanders. Taken to the military hospital, he had an arm amputated but died shortly after. Connell was only 19 years old.

The parents chose the inscription for his grave which read: 'In the shelter of thy sacred heart Dear Jesus may he rest'.

Patrick Burns

camerons

2nd Batt. Scots Rifles (Cameronians)
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 30.

The family home was at Alma Place, HelensburghThe son of Lawrence Burns (labourer) and Mary Burns (outdoor worker).
Siblings: Patrick had two older brothers Michael (baker) and Lawrence, who also served and died at Flanders in 1914.

Patrick Burns was born at Alma Place and brought up in Helensburgh. His father Lawrence was a labourer and his mother Mary an outdoor worker. By the 1911 census, when Patrick was 18 years old, his mother Mary was described as head of the household.

Patrick worked as a labourer before enlisting.

Patrick fought at Flanders and after being reported missing was confirmed to have been killed in action in April 1917. He was 24 years old.

His remains were not recovered, and he has no known grave.

His older brother, Lawrence, died in 1914.

Angus Campbell

Seaforths

5th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders .
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Kilmacolm War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 31.

The family home was at 4 Sinclair Street, Helensburgh. The son of Donald Campbell, Rosebank Terrace, Kilmacolm
Siblings: His brother Donald Campbell, who served in the Cameron Highlanders, died 23rd April, 1917

Angus Campbell was born in Inverness-shire and later moved to Helensburgh, where he was employed by D.D. McDonald, Spirit Merchants.

The 1911 census shows him living at 4 Sinclair Street, with his sister, Flora Fraser, his nephew, and two lodgers.

He first enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (service No. 32602) at the outbreak of war, later transferring to the 5th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders.

Angus was killed in action in France. He was 36 years old. The image (left) shows both his and his brother's name on the Kilmacolm War Memorial.

Ian Stewart Campbell

Australian Imperial Force

34th Batt. Australian Imperial Force
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Australian War Memorial, Canberra and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 32.

The family home was at 12 George Street, Helensburgh The son of Private Daniel S. Campbell, (also serving with the Australian Imperial Force), and Margaret Smith
Siblings: Younger sisters Jessie and Edith and brother Alistair were all born in Helensburgh. Alistair was too young to join up.

Ian Campbell was born in Helensburgh and educated at the Hermitage Higher Grade School. His grandparents own the auction saleroom in Sinclair Street. In 1908 his parents emigrated to Sydney, NSW, Australia on board the 'Karoola' with the two youngest children. Ian and his sister Jessie joined them the following year. At the outbreak of war Ian's father Daniel joined the Australian Imperial Force to fight for the King and Empire. After serving in the senior cadet force at Fort Street Boys High School, Ian joined up in January, 1916 and was deployed to France. Ian was promoted to corporal in April 1917 and was killed in action two months later. He was only 19 years of age.

John Fyshe Campbell

Argylls

8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Columba’s Church memorial, the Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 33.

The son of John and Annabella Campbell, 42 Boyd Street, Largs
Siblings: John had an older sister, Margaret, who was a milliner. He had lodgings as 28 John Street, Helensburgh

John Campbell was born and brought up in Largs, Ayrshire. After passing his banking exams he worked as a teller at the Clydesdale Bank in Helensburgh. During this time he lodged with a Mrs Catherine Combs at 28 John Street in the town.
John Campbell was a volunteer in the Territorial Army before the outbreak of war.
John died at Flanders in April, 1917 from wounds received in battle. He was 28 years of age.
His parents chose the inscription: 'He died that we might live. May we live worthy of such sacrifice'.

John Cunningham

camerons

11th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Park Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 34.

The family home was at 22 East Argyle Street, Helensburgh
The son of John Cunningham (coachbuilder) and Margaret Cunningham (nee Glen) of 3 West King Street.
Siblings: One sister, Lilian. Married to Lily Ferguson Cunningham, (nee MacGregor), a librarian on the 20th October, 1915.

John Cunningham was born at 70 West Princes Street, Helensburgh where his father was a coachbuilder. After being educated at the Clyde Street School and then Hermitage Higher Grade School, he became a grocer’s assistant with William Shields and Co. in the town. He then went to Rhodesia to work.

He returned in September of 1915 in order to marry Lily Ferguson MacGregor, a librarian, on 20th October. He then enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

John died of wounds received in Flanders Fields in August 1917. He was 33 years old.

William Dempster

camerons

Machine Gun Corps.
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, the St Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh Baptist Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 44.

The family home was at Argyll Buildings, Innellan
The son of Alex Dempster

William Dempster was already in the Territorial Army at the outbreak of war. Lodging at 90, West Princes Street with a Mrs Charles McKechnie, he was employed as a grocer’s assistant and van man with Walter Duncan in Helensburgh. He was a member of the local Salvation Army.

William had first enlisted in the 9th Batt. the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders but after being wounded and suffering gas poisoning in June of 1915, was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

William was killed in action in May, 1917 at Arras. He was 23 years of age.

Peter Dewar

Royal field artillery

64th Batt. Royal Field Artillery
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 35.

The family home was at 41 Glenfield Street, Dennistoun.
The son of the late Donald Dewar, (gardener) and Elizabeth Dewar (nee Hine).
Siblings: He had a brother, Donald, serving as 2nd Lieutenant in the 6th Rifle Brigade, a sister, Annie, (a shop assistant) and a younger brother, Neil who did not serve. There is also mention that he was the second son, but no trace of an older brother could be found.

Peter Dewar was born at Boyd Place, 13, West King Street, Helensburgh, where his father was a gardener. After an apprenticeship with J.W. McCulloch and Sons as a painter and decorator, he joined the Royal Horse Artillery in 1905 at the age of 17.

Peter spent 7 years in India with the army before being recalled at the outbreak of war and served in France from October, 1914 in the Royal Field Artillery.

Peter died of wounds received in battle. He was 29 years old.

There is mention of descendents at a military address, Fyzabed, Oudh, India.

William Dickson

Royal field artillery

Royal Navy (Mercantile Marine Reserve)
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Helensburgh Old Parish Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 36.

The family home was at 142 Waddell Street, Glasgow
The eldest son of William Dickson (police constable) and Elizabeth Wallace Dickson.
Siblings: Wilhelmina, John, Margaret and Alice

William Dickson was born in Helensburgh, son of a police constable, but moved with his family to Glasgow. He had been employed by J & A McLean, grocers, before emigrating to Canada around 1912.

William returned to join the Royal Navy, Mercantile Marine Reserve and served on HM Yacht Kethailes initially patrolling the North Sea and then transferred to the Irish Sea. There, whilst on a local patrol, she collided with the Bibby Line steamer ‘Leicestershire’ about 11 miles north-east of the Blackwater Light Vessel and sank. Seventeen men were lost. Bodies that washed ashore were buried near Barmouth, mid-Wales.

William was remembered by his aunt, Miss Wallace of 37, East King Street. He was 33 years of age.

John Gilchrist Don

Royal field artillery

 

7th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 46.

The family home was at Millerslea Terrace, 6, William Street, Helensburgh
The son of John Gilchrist Don and Helen Don (nee Laing)
Siblings: John had two sisters, Helen and Jessie and three brothers who all fought in the war. Charles and David survived but James died in 1918.
John Don was born at 29, West King Street, Helensburgh, where his father owned a gardening business. John was employed as a gardener in his father's business before he enlisted.
He joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in early 1916 and went to France in July of that year. All four brothers served. Charles and David surviving the war but James was killed in action the year after John.
John married Isabella Gove, a domestic servant on the 27th June, 1916, before leaving for France.
John was reported at wounded on the 4th of September 1917, dying on the 15th of that month, aged 32 years.

William Stirling Donald

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Canadian Expeditionary Force
He is remembered with honour on the St. Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 37.

The family home was at 2, Prince Albert Terrace, Helensburgh. The son of Archibald Donald, master blacksmith, (deceased) and Eleanor Jemima Donald (nee Stirling).
Siblings: William came from a large family, Archibald, Margaret, Jean, Christina, Eleanor, Molly, Georgina and Agnes.

William Donald was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. After leaving school, he worked his way up to being manager of the Ironmongery Shop in Sinclair Street, Helensburgh. He was a member of the St. Columba Church where he sang in the choir. He was also a keen football player and angler.
Later, having married Jeanie Burns Donald, he emigrated to Canada where he worked as a druggist with the Edmonton Drug Co.. William returned in 1916 with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.
William died at Vimy Ridge leaving his wife and two small children, who were then living at Kilmalcolm.
The Battle of Vimy Ridge was fought in April 1917. Four divisions of the Canadian Corps captured it from the German army. It was the largest territorial advance of any Allied force at that point in the war.

James Moor Gilmour Drummond

Highland Light Infantry

16th Batt. Highland Light Infantry He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 39.

The family home was at 7, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of George Drummond (plumber) and Mary Drummond (nee Gilmour).

James Drummond was born at 73, East Clyde Street in Helensburgh where his father was a plumber journeyman.

He later resided in Lanark.

He was killed in action, fighting in the Aisne, France, at the age of 31.

Harold Forrester Duncan

Royal Flying corps

Royal Flying Corps
He is remembered with honour on the St. Michael’s Church Roll of Honour, Larchfield School Memorial, Sedbergh School Cloisters, the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 40.

The family home was at Polkemmet, 6, Upper Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh
The son of Major John Forrester and Mrs Stella Sinclair Duncan (nee Mellish), who owned a tobacconists locally. His father was later to become Provost of Helensburgh.
Siblings: Lieutenant Alan M. Duncan served with the Highland Light Infantry in France.
Sopworth

Harold Duncan was born in Helensburgh, where his family owned Mellish Tobacconists. His father had a military background and was later to be Provost of the town. Harold attended Miss Johnston's school, Larchfield and Sedbergh School in Cumbria. Training as an accountant, he was employed by Messrs Bannatyne and Guthrie C.A., Glasgow.

He joined the Highland Light Infantry (3rd/5th Batt), then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps (70 Squadron). He was badly wounded in a dog fight over the Somme, dying a few days later. He had just been awarded the Military Cross for ‘Conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an aerial combat.’

Only a short time before his death, whilst on leave, he had become engaged to Miss Young of Dunalwyn, 2, West Abercromby Street.

His gravestone reads: ‘Love than death itself more strong’.

 

John Joseph Elliot (Elliott)

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 41.

The family home was at 20, James Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Mary Elliot.
Siblings: John had four younger brothers, Robert, Hugh, Joseph and Thomas, all serving in the colours. His brother Thomas, died, killed in action, only two months before John. John had one sister, Hannah.
John Elliot was born in Helensburgh and was employed as a slater before enlisting. He was living with his siblings and widowed mother.
He died at Ypres, killed in action, whilst attached to the Seaforth Highlanders. He was 41 years old.

Thomas Elliot (Elliot

Argylls

1/8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on Arras Memorial, the St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 42.

The family home was at 20, James Street, Helensburgh The son of Mary Elliot
Siblings: There were five brothers, John, Robert, Hugh and Joseph, all serving in the colours. His brother John, died, killed in action, only two months after Thomas.
Thomas Elliot was born in Helensburgh and was employed as a gardener before enlisting. He was living with his siblings and widowed mother.
He died at Arras, killed in action, whilst attached to the Seaforth Highlanders. He was 25 years of age. His remains were not recovered.

James Gibson

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on Tyne Cot Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, St Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 43.

The family home was at Bank of Scotland Buildings, 36 West Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of James Gibson (Bank Manager) and his wife, Margaret. Siblings: James had one younger sister, Margaret.
James Gibson was born in Lanarkshire, and moved to Helensburgh where his father was the Manager of the Bank of Scotland. He was educated at Hermitage Higher School and worked for a short time at the office of Donaldson Shipping line before joining up at the outbreak of war. James died at Ypres, at the age of 22 years. The location of his grave is unknown.

Murdoch Gillies

Kosb

6st Batt. King's Own Scottish Borderers.
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Helensburgh Post Office Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 44.

The family home was at Iona Cottage, Helensburgh. The son of John Gillies, Waterstem, Glendale, Isle of Skye.
Murdoch Gillies was born near Inverness. He may have lived in Iona Cottage in Helensburgh for some time.
He married Jessie Neish who was reportedly living in North Berwick at the time of his death.
Murdoch died at Arras in May, 1917, originally posted as missing and later confirmed that he had been killed in action. The location of his grave is unknown.

David Gilmour

kosb

King's Own Scottish Borderers
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 45.

The family home was at 52a, Sinclair Street, and later 66, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of James and Catherine Keith Gilmour.

David Gilmour was born at Old Street, Blackford, Perthshire, and moved to Helensburgh as a child, where his father was a brewery carter. He trained as a mason with A. Trail and Sons, builders. He was also a member of the local fire brigade.
He was married, and he and his wife Winnie and had two children, a daughter, Annie, and a son, James.
David was killed in action at the Somme. He was aged 39.

James Graham

Argylls

11th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 46.

The family home was at 40 East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of James Graham (railway porter) and Susan Graham (nee Nealus).

James Graham was born at 40, East Clyde Street in Helensburgh where his father was employed as a railway porter. He attended St Michael's Church of England Preparatory School in Glasgow before being employed by John Brown, General Merchant, West Princes Street, Helensburgh.
James joined up in 1914 at the outbreak of war.
James was reported missing during the Battle of Arras on the 23rd April, 1917. In August 1918, it is recorded that he was killed in action on that date. His remains were not recovered. He was 24 years old.

John Gunning

camerons

8th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 47.

The family home was at Alma Place in Helensburgh before the family moved to Glasgow.
The son of James Gunning (labourer) and Mary Gunning (nee Johnstone).
Siblings: Two sisters, one older, Nellie and one younger, Mary.

John Gunning was born at Alma Place, Helensburgh. His father James, who was born in Ireland, worked as a labourer.

By the time John was fourteen, his mother had died and his sister Nellie was keeping house. John worked as a message boy for a butcher before enlisting.

John was killed in action during the Battle of Arras. He was 21 years old

David Sydney Hall. M.C.

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and Royal Flying Corps
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Congregational Church Memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 48.

The family home was at Birkfell, 30 Charlotte Street, Helensburgh. The son of William and Annie Fleming Hall.
Siblings: David was the youngest of four children, Jeanie, Harry, and William.

military medalDavid Sydney Hall was born in Grangemouth and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a grocer and laundry proprietor. He was educated at Dunoon Grammar School, Hermitage School, and Hillhead High School. On leaving school David worked for Paterson and Benzie Chartered Accountants.

David enlisted in September 1914, firstly in the 17th Glasgow Commercials Batt. (Highland Light Infantry) and was then commissioned into the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In December 1916, he was seconded as a Lieutenant to the Royal Flying Corps, later appointed a flight commander in June 1917. He flew De Havilland 4 bombers with 55 Squadron.

David was awarded the Military Cross for actions on 2nd October 1917: 'For conspicuous Gallantry and Devotion to duty. While leading back his formation of five machines from a bombing raid he was attacked on eight different occasions by numerous enemy scouts'. On 20th November 1917, David flew on a weather reconnaissance mission. The conditions were poor, and the plane crashed, killing David and his observer. He was 25 years old.

Charles William Hewer

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School memorial, Merchiston Castle School memorial, St Bride’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 49.

The family home was at Bowling and also with his aunt, Miss Freebairn, at 5 Glennan Gardens, Helensburgh.
The son of Captain W.C Hewer and Mrs Jessie Hewer..

 

Charles Hewer was born in Bowling and educated at Larchfield and Merchiston Castle, Edinburgh. He worked at the Glasgow Office of the General Accident Fire and Life Assurance Co., before joining up. Charles joined as a private service No. 2559 at the outbreak of war, then gazetted as Lieutenant to the London Scottish Battalion in July, 1916.

Charles died, killed in action at Passchendaele aged 22. His remains were not recovered. 

William Hosie

Camerons

5/6th Batt. Scottish Rifles (Cameronians)
He is remembered with honour on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, St Bride’s Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 50.

William Hosie was born at 11, John Street, Helensburgh where his father was a coachman.
He was employed as a van driver with Western District of the County Council before joining up.

 


William joined the Scottish Rifles in 1914 at the outbreak of war. He was reported missing at Passchendaele in September of 1917 and confirmed killed in action at that date in July 1918. There is no known grave. He was 36 years old.

His younger brother David also served and survived the war.

William Kerr

Royal Artillery

Royal Horse and Field Artillery
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St. Columba’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 51.

The family home was at Fountain Bank, 87, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Robert Reside and Jeanie Galloway Kerr.
Siblings: William had two brothers, Robert served in the Clyde R.G.A. and reported as seriously wounded but survived the war. Brother Daniel was too young to fight.

William Kerr was born at 67, East King Street in Helensburgh where his father was a joiner.
He was employed by Waldie and Co., coachmen and carters, before enlisting.
William was killed in action at Ypres. He had only just turned 21 years of age.

Page 1 of 2