Super User

Super User

David Sydney Hall. M.C.

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and Royal Flying Corps
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Congregational Church Memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 48.

The family home was at Birkfell, 30 Charlotte Street, Helensburgh. The son of William and Annie Fleming Hall.
Siblings: David was the youngest of four children, Jeanie, Harry, and William.

military medalDavid Sydney Hall was born in Grangemouth and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a grocer and laundry proprietor. He was educated at Dunoon Grammar School, Hermitage School, and Hillhead High School. On leaving school David worked for Paterson and Benzie Chartered Accountants.

David enlisted in September 1914, firstly in the 17th Glasgow Commercials Batt. (Highland Light Infantry) and was then commissioned into the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In December 1916, he was seconded as a Lieutenant to the Royal Flying Corps, later appointed a flight commander in June 1917. He flew De Havilland 4 bombers with 55 Squadron.

David was awarded the Military Cross for actions on 2nd October 1917: 'For conspicuous Gallantry and Devotion to duty. While leading back his formation of five machines from a bombing raid he was attacked on eight different occasions by numerous enemy scouts'. On 20th November 1917, David flew on a weather reconnaissance mission. The conditions were poor, and the plane crashed, killing David and his observer. He was 25 years old.

William McDonald

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 7.

The family home was at 50, East Princes Street, Helensburgh. The grandson of Captain Archibald McDonald (Yachtsman) and Helen McDonald who lived in Maitland Buildings. The son of Archibald McDonald (house painter).
Siblings: William had an older sister, Mary.

 

William McDonald was born in Glasgow. He was brought up, along with his sister, in Helensburgh by his father, who was a house painter, and his grandparents.

William served his apprenticeship as a baker with Mr McAdam before enlisting in 1915.

William died of wounds received in battle. He was 24 years of age.

James Speirs

Cameronians

Cameron Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 53.

The family home was 18, Maitland Street, Helensburgh. The son of William and Agnes Speirs.
Siblings: James had three sisters, Mary, Annie and Agnes.


James Speirs was born in Glasgow and lived briefly in Helensburgh before the family returned to Glasgow, where his father was a barber.

Moving to Helensburgh, he married Annie and worked with Andrew Spy, coal merchant, in the town. He was living at 37, Grant Street, and was bringing up 4 children, when he enlisted at the outbreak of war. Having served with the Cameron Highlanders he later transferred to the Labour Corps.

James was being treated, post war, for shell shock by electric treatment when he died of an aneurism. He was 40 years old and wa buried in Helensburgh Cemetery.

George Bruce Walker

RAF

Royal Flying Corps (Royal Air Force)
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St. Ninian's Church War Memorial, Pollockshields and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 51.

The family home was Elmtree Villa, 19, Suffolk Street, Helensburgh.The son of John Walker and Helen May Walker (nee Porteous).
Siblings: George had 1 younger sister, Eleanor Elizabeth.

 

George Walker was born in Cathcart, later moving with his family to Helensburgh.
He was an apprentice Chartered Accountant before joining the Highland Light Infantry later being transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. He played rugby for the RFC.
In 1917, George was involved in a flying accident when his Maurice Farman Shorthorn aircraft crashed, whilst landing during a training flight, at Turnhouse, near Edinburgh. He suffered from a fractured spine which left him paralysed and bedridden for the next two years.
George's death certificate shows that he died at Garnet Bank, 37, Campbell Street.

Bernard (Brine) McDonald

Argylls

2nd Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 8.

The family home was at The Barracks, James Street, Helensburgh. The son of John and Mary McDonald.
Siblings: Brine had two married sisters, Elizabeth, married to  James Donachie. Hannah married Alfred Gibson, living at 38, Maitland Street.

Brine McDonald was born in Helensburgh where his father was a general labourer. His parents had moved to the town from Belfast. He had previously been a professional soldier and although employed as a postman at the outbreak of war was quick to re-enlist. Brine died of influenza in a prisoner of war camp in Germany after being reported missing in action and then confirmed as captured. He died aged 34 years.
Brine left a wife, Sarah, and two small children living in Hutcheson, Glasgow.

Donald MacDonald

Argylls

1/8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Congregational Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 44.

The family home was at 9, West King Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Donald and Betsy MacDonald.
Siblings:  Donald had two older brothers, Archibald and James who both served and survived the war, and two younger siblings Mary and Allan.

Donald MacDonald was born in Helensburgh, the son of a gardener working at Row House. He enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders at the age of 17. Donald was wounded in 1917 and then wounded again in October 1918. He died from his wounds at the Whipps Cross Military Hospital, London, in February, 1919. He was aged 22. Donald is buried at Helensburgh Cemetery.

William Duncan Inglis

Machine gun corp

Machine Gun Corps Infantry.
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 2.

The family home was at 17, West King Street, Helensburgh where he lived with his uncle, James Black.
The son of James Inglis (letter carrier) and Elizabeth Inglis (nee Duncan).

 

William Inglis was born at 57, East King Street, Helensburgh where his father was a letter carrier. He later lived with his uncle, James Black. He was employed by MacNeur and Bryden as a printer and typesetter before he enlisted. He was also a musician with the Renton Prize Band.He initially joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in 1914, service no. 4453, transferring to the Machine Gun Corps in August, 1916.
William was killed in action aged 31 years. 

William Hosie

Camerons

5/6th Batt. Scottish Rifles (Cameronians)
He is remembered with honour on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, St Bride’s Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 50.

William Hosie was born at 11, John Street, Helensburgh where his father was a coachman.
He was employed as a van driver with Western District of the County Council before joining up.

 


William joined the Scottish Rifles in 1914 at the outbreak of war. He was reported missing at Passchendaele in September of 1917 and confirmed killed in action at that date in July 1918. There is no known grave. He was 36 years old.

His younger brother David also served and survived the war.

Charles William Hewer

Argylls

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School memorial, Merchiston Castle School memorial, St Bride’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 49.

The family home was at Bowling and also with his aunt, Miss Freebairn, at 5 Glennan Gardens, Helensburgh.
The son of Captain W.C Hewer and Mrs Jessie Hewer..

 

Charles Hewer was born in Bowling and educated at Larchfield and Merchiston Castle, Edinburgh. He worked at the Glasgow Office of the General Accident Fire and Life Assurance Co., before joining up. Charles joined as a private service No. 2559 at the outbreak of war, then gazetted as Lieutenant to the London Scottish Battalion in July, 1916.

Charles died, killed in action at Passchendaele aged 22. His remains were not recovered. 

George William Young

Black Watch

4th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School Memorial, the Park Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 39.

The family home was Rockmount, 108, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh.The son of James and Laticia Lillah Young.
Siblings: George had three sisters, Margaret, Alma and Gertrude.

George Young was born in Helensburgh, attended Larchfield School and had been working in India as a tea planter when war broke out. He had connections with India as both his mother and older sister had been born in Bengal.
He returned at the outbreak of war and enlisted in the Black Watch.
Initially, he was reported as missing. Then his mother received a postcard stating her son was in a German hospital in Limburg. William died, from wounds received in battle, at the age of 36.
His family's inscription on his gravestone reads: 'In Loving Memory of George, Underneath are the everlasting arms'

Page 2 of 21