1915 (41)

These are the stories behind those who fell between 1915-16

George Meiklejohn Allan

Argylls

1st/9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Helensburgh Baptist Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1, Line 7.

The family home was at 18, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of Robert Allan (upholsterer) and his wife Helen.
Siblings: George had one older sister, Mary and one younger sister, Helen (known as Nellie).


George Allan was born in Stirling and later moved to Helensburgh where his father was an upholsterer.
On leaving school George became an errand boy before joining up.
George died of wounds on Flanders fields aged 19 years. His family had the inscription 'O How Blest Are You Whose Toil is Ended' placed on his headstone.

John B. Allan

Royal marine light infantry

Royal Marine Light Infantry. Cycle Scout Company.
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1, Line 8.

The family home was at Millerslea Terrace, 8 William Street, Helensburgh.
The son of John and Jane Combs Allan
Siblings: John had one older sister, Henrietta.

John Allen was employed as an office clerk to Mr Kyle, Temperance Lawyer in Glasgow before joining up. He was an enthusiastic rower and was secretary of the Scottish Rowing Society.
John was an ex-Clyde Ordinary Seaman, service no. Z1383 as part of the RNVR. He enlisted in the Royal Marines Light Infantry on the 23rd of October, 1914 and was transferred to the Cycle Scout Company in December of that year.
He was removed from the trenches in the Dardanelles to a hospital ship suffering from dysentery and enteric fever, dying in hospital on Malta aged 24.

James Crawford Bonnar

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Columba’s Roll of Honour, Larchfield School memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial
Column 1 Line 9.

The family home was Cairnsmore, 16 Queen Street, Helensburgh
The son of Provost, James Dick Bonnar and Isabella Crawford Bonnar.
Siblings: James had two sisters, Helen and Florence.
bonnar funeralJames Bonnar was brought up in Helensburgh, son of the Provost of the town. He attended Larchfield School before training as a stockbroker with his uncle, Fred G. Cook, in Glasgow.
James had been home on leave after the horrors of the Battle of Ypres and was returning by rail when the train was involved in an accident at Quintinshill, near Gretna. Fifteen of the carriages on the troop train caught fire. He died at the scene along with 226 others and with 246 injured. It is, to this day, the country's worst rail disaster.
His body was brought home and his funeral was held in St Columba Church, Helensburgh and he was buried in Helensburgh Cemetery with full military honours. James was only 27 years of age.
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Neil Boyle

camerons

1st Batt. Queens Own Cameron Highlanders.
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Park Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 10.

His obituary was placed by his aunt, Mrs E. Robertson, whose address was Outfitters, West Princes Street, Helensburgh.
The son of the late John Boyle (mason) and the late Catherine Boyle, (nee Jamieson).

Neil Boyle was born at 53, West Princes Street, Helensburgh and was brought up in the town, where his father was a mason and later a spirit salesman. Both parents predeceased Neil.

Neil enlisted 7 years before the outbreak of war and was a career soldier as a bandsman.

Neil was badly wounded in France and Flanders and was returned to the UK. He died of his injuries in Tooting Military Hospital, aged 24.

There is a mention in his obituary in the Helensburgh and Gareloch Times of a widow, described as Edith McCauley (formerly Boyle) of 32c, South High Street, Port Arthur, Ontario.

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Herbert Brinn Brown

Argylls

1/9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Columba’s Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 11.

His family home was at East Thorn, 14 Adelaide Street, Helensburgh.
The son of James and Charlotte (nee Brinn) Brown.
Siblings:  His brothers Stanley and David both served during the war. Pictured here, Herbert is seated.

Herbert Brown was born at 72, East Princes Street in Helensburgh and was educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School. His father, James, was a local fishmonger.

He trained as a banker with the local branch of the Bank of Scotland, later transferring to Perth and then to Glasgow head office.

Herbert was a keen athlete and served as secretary of both the local amateur rowing club and the swimming club.

Herbert was badly wounded at the Battle of Ypres and died of his wounds in hospital in Boulogne. He was 29 years of age.

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Fife Bryson

Dragoon Guards

5th Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales Regiment)
He is remembered with honour on the St Columba Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 49.

His family home was at Rocklea Cottage, 217 East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of Robert (nurseryman) and Annie Bryson
Fife Bryson was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a nurseryman, and was educated at the Hermitage School.
Having served his apprenticeship, he was working at Scott's Shipyard in Greenock at the outbreak of war. He was resident in Greenock when he enlisted in 1914.
Fife died fighting at the Bethune Front, Flanders, he was 21 year of age.
Written by

Thomas Rennie Burdon

Cameronians

1/8th Batt. Scots Rifles (Cameronians)
He is remembered with honour on the Helles Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 12.

The family home was at 11, Hawthorn Terrace, Lomond Street, Helensburgh.The son of John Burdon (engine driver).
Siblings: Three bothers all served. Seaman Jack Burdon RNVR also served in the Dardanelles, James Heggie Burdon served in France and was reported as a prison of war in Germany. Another, name unknown, served in England. 
Thomas Burdon was brought up in Helensburgh and was employed by the Railway at Sighthill Goods Station in Glasgow prior to volunteering in 1914.
He was one of four brothers who all served during the war.
He was first reported missing in action at Gallipolli in June, 1915 and was not confirmed as killed in action, until June, 1916 Thomas was 21 years of age.
His remains were not recovered.

Peter Campbell

camerons

6th Batt. Cameron Highlanders. He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Glasgow University Roll of Honour,
Glasgow Education Memorial to Teachers, the Glasgow Provincial Training College Memorial, Dovehill Primary School Memorial, St Columba’s memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 13.

The family home was at 5 James Street, Helensburgh
The son of James (postman) and Margaret Packman Campbell.
Siblings: His older brother, James, was in the machine gun section of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Peter Campbell was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a postman who also served in the war. He was educated Hermitage Higher Grade School and later went on to the University of Glasgow from 1909- 1912.

He gained a first-class Certificate of Merit for Logic and Metaphysics and went on to graduate with an MA at the age of 22. He then took a teacher training course at Glasgow Provincial Training College and taught at Dovehill Primary School before enlisting.

Peter was not to return to his promising teaching career as he died, aged 25, of wounds and gas poisoning at the Battle of Hill 70, near Lens, Nord, France during the Third Battle of Ypres. He is buried less than fifty kilometres from his cousin Ian Stewart Campbell. His parents chose the inscription: ‘Home is the sailor from sea and the hunter home from the hill’ for his gravestone.

The Battle of Hill 70 took place on the outskirts of Lens in the Nord region of France from 15th-25th August, 1917. Cameron Highlanders joined the Canadian Corps to assault and draw German troops from the 3rd Battle of Ypres.

Emily Helena Cole

nurse

Queen Alexandra's Imperial Nursing Service.
She is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Queen Alexandra's Military Hospital Memorial, Millbank, London (later removed to the Royal Garrison Church, Aldershot) and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 14.

Her widowed mother lived at Sunnyside Cottage, Helensburgh from 1905 - 1914.
The daughter of Mr C.J. and Mrs E.H. Cole.
Siblings: One older sister.
EmilycoleEmily Cole (known as Helena by her family) was born in South Africa, the second daughter of C.J. Cole, a colonial government contractor, and Mrs E.H. Cole. On the death of her father, the family returned to Bournemouth where Emily attended the Knole Hall High School. On leaving school she trained as a nurse at the British East India Company's Poplar Hospital from 1908 to 1911.
She enlisted in the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Nursing Service in January, 1912. At the outbreak of war, she was sent to the No. 14 Hospital at Wimeraux, Bologne. She died of cerebro-spinal fever in February, 1915 aged 32. Emily was awarded the 1914 Star, and posthumously, the British War and Victory Medals.

John Eugene Havelock Currie

nurse

1st Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Glasgow University Roll of Honour, the Le Touret Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 15. John was awarded the D.C.M. for 'great gallantry and devotion to duty'

The family home was at 84 Springkell Avenue, Pollockshields, Glasgow
The son of Cecil Charles David Currie (wine merchant) and Mary Jane Watson Currie.
Siblings: Two younger sisters, Alice and Marion.

John Currie was born at Burnside Cottage, Helensburgh and later moved with the family to Glasgow, where his father was a wine merchant. He came from a military family. He was educated at The High School of Glasgow and studied Chemistry at the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College (later Strathclyde University). He was a member of the Cadet Corps at school and the O.T.C. at university. He worked as an analytical chemist with Messrs Alex Ferguson and Co. in Maryhill.

At the outbreak of war, he was offered a commission but due to delay he enlisted as a private with the 5th Cameron Highlanders and was then gazetted to the Royal Scots Fusiliers. He served with the 8th, 3rd and 1st Battalions and deployed to France in July 1915.

John was shot whilst leading a working party attempting to cut a path through the woods to the enemy lines. He was buried at Sanctuary Wood, but this cemetery was later damaged during fighting. He is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial. John was awarded the D.C.M. for 'great gallantry and devotion to duty'.

Written by

James. (A) Knox Donaldson

5th Canadian Rifles

5th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Quebec Regiment
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 16.

The family home was at North Lodge, Shandon Hydropathic Hotel. The son of John Knox Donaldson (coachman) and Euphemia Donaldson.
Siblings: James was the eldest of eight children, John, Robert, William, Elizabeth, Euphemia, Duncan and Alex.
James Donaldson born at the North Lodge, Shandon Hydropathic Hotel, where his father was a coachman. He was employed as a gardener at the hotel before emigrating to Canada where he was employed as a florist.
He was married to Mary Donaldson and lived in Brampton, Ontario.
James joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and returned to fight for his country. He died at Ypres, killed in action, at the age of 32 years.
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David Dorward

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the Menin Gate Memorial, the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 17.

The family home was at 50, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of David Dorward and Sarah Dorward (nee Wilson)

David Dorward was born at Townhill Lodge, Dumfries and then brought up in Helensburgh where his father was a gardener. He worked as a general labourer before enlisting in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

David married Sarah McNeilage Ness, a domestic servant, on 26th June 1914. Only a year later he was listed as missing in action, and then confirmed killed in action in June 1915. He was officially confirmed as dead in April 1916. His remains were not recovered.

David was 31 years of age.

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David Drummond

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 18.

The family home was at 29, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of David and Catherine Drummond
Siblings: David had two sisters, Nellie and Jessie.
David Drummond was born at Barony, Glasgow and later moved to Helensburgh with his family. David was employed as a gardener and was also a volunteer/reservist with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, he was called up at the outbreak of war in August, 1914.
David was wounded in action and returned home to England for hospital treatment. He died at Woolwich Hospital in January, 1915, he was only 19 years of age.
He was buried at Helensburgh Cemetery with full military honours.
Friday, 12 June 2020 12:47 Written by

Alva Alexander Graham

Royal Scots

6th Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers. He is remembered with honour on the Loos Memorial, St. Andrew Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 19.

The family home was at 120, Luss Road, Helensburgh. The son of Richard and Margaret Baxter Graham.
Siblings: Alva had one younger sister, Mary.

Alva Graham was born at 8 Glenfinlas Street in Helensburgh and brought up in the town, with his younger sister, Mary, where his father was a signalman on the railway. On leaving school he followed in his father's footsteps by becoming a railway worker. Alva joined the army in August, 1914 and was killed in action at Loos only 13 months later. He was 20 years old.

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John Gourley Harvey

Argylls

10th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Loos Memorial, the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 20.

The family home was at 140, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh
The son of John Gourley Harvey (distiller) and Christina Harvey (nee Arthur).
Siblings: Margaret, Christina, Allan, Mary, Maud, Rebecca, Rachel, Arthur, Edith and Elsie.

 

John Harvey was born at Woodend, Houston, Renfrewshire before moving to Helensburgh with his family and being educated at Hermitage High Grade School.
John served his apprenticeship with David Rowan and Co, marine engineers and was later employed by Kincaids of Greenock.
He returned from Calcutta, India to fight for his country. It is not known if he had a family in India. John died, killed in action at Loos aged 34.
Tuesday, 16 June 2020 06:22

Harold James Macrae Keith

Australian Imperial Force

4th Batt. Australian Imperial Force
He is remembered with honour on, Lone Pine Memorial, the St. Columba Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 21.

The family home was 27, Robertson Street, Greenock. The son of Frederick Macrae and Margaret Bryson Keith. Siblings: Unknown.

 

William Bryson, Provost 1884-90Harold Keith was born in Helensburgh where his maternal Grandfather was the Provost of the town. He attended Hermitage Higher Grade School.
He was employed by steel manufacturers Stewart and Lloyds, 4 Oswald St., Glasgow for 4 years before being promoted and sent to the office in Sydney, Australia.
He returned at the outbreak of war with the Australian Imperial Force.
Harold died, killed in action, aged 26. His remains were not recovered.
The Image was taken when Harold was a signaller in the Glasgow Highlanders.

The Grandson of the late, ex William Bryson, Provost 1884-90. Painted by
James Duncan ©Argyll and Bute Council.

Written by

George MacKay

Argylls

1/9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National Memorial, St Andrew’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 24.

The family home was at 82, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh.
The son of George and Jeanie Logan MacKay.
Siblings: George was one of six children. Three of his brothers served, Hugh and James with the Royal Engineers and Duncan with the 2/9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. They all survived the war. The eldest brother William was in a reserved occupation on the railways. They had one sister Catherine.
George MacKay was born at 37, Sinclair Street and brought up in the town, where his father was a journeyman plasterer. He was employed as an upholsterer to trade and was described as an enthusiastic territorial before enlisting.

George MacKay was born at 37, Sinclair Street and brought up in the town, where his father was a journeyman plasterer. He was employed as an upholsterer to trade and was described as an enthusiastic territorial before enlisting.
George was the first soldier serving in the local 1/9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to be killed at Ypres. He died from wounds received by sniper fire whilst leaving the trenches at the age of 24. He was buried with full military honours and a piper played by his graveside.
The family inscription on his grave reads: 'Until the Day Dawn'.

View a letter from George as he waits to leave for France "My dear sister..."
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Gordon Fordyce MacLachlan

Camerons

5th Batt. Cameron Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Loos Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, Helensburgh Old Parish Church memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 27.

The family home was at Rowan Brae, Helensburgh.
The son of David S and Helen MacLachlan.
Siblings: John had two older brothers, William (a clerk) and Charles (baker).

Provost MaclachlanGordon MacLachlan was born in Dumbarton and brought up in Helensburgh, where he went to Hermitage Higher Grade School. His father David owned a local bakery and restaurant and was also Town Provost 1908-1911 (inset left).

Gordon has just finished his apprenticeship as a civil engineer before enlisting.

Gordon was first reported as missing and then confirmed as killed in action. He was 22 years of age. His remain were not recovered.

Provost David S MacLachlan ©Argyll and Bute Council

 

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James Webster MacLay

Scottish Rifles

1/7th Batt. Scottish Rifles
He is remembered with honour on the Kilmacolm Roll of Honour, St Columba’s Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 25.

The family home was at Brantwoode, 4, Munro Drive, Helensburgh and Eastwood, Kilmacolm.
The son of William Paton and Mary Jane Fraser Webster MacLay.

James MacLay was born in Kilmacolm, Renfrewshire and grew up between his family homes in Kilmacolm and Helensburgh. He was educated at Rossall School, Fleetwood, Lancashire where he served in the cadet corps for four years. He later attended The Glasgow Academy before enlisting in the army.

His uncle, Joseph Paton Maclay was Minister for Shipping and two of his cousins also served and died; William MacLay at Gallipoli in 1915 and Ebenezer Maclay at Arras in 1918.

James died in February serving with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, but his death was not registered until June 1915. He was 18 years old and the youngest officer in his regiment.

The inscription on his headstone simply reads: 'Native of Kilmacolm, Scotland'.

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James Francis Marsland

Leinster Regiment

2nd Batt. Leinster Regiment
He is remembered with honour on the Old Parish Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 28.

The family home was at Marine View, Helensburgh. The son of QMS James Marsland, a Crimean veteran and janitor of the Hermitage Higher School.
Siblings: Brothers, Lt. Fred Marsland served with the R.A.M.C. and William, who lived at Craigbank, 2, Glasgow Street and was a Prudential Insurance Agent.

James Marsland, known as Jim, grew up in an army family. His father was a Quarter Master Sergeant and veteran of the Crimea war, before becoming janitor at Hermitage Higher School. On leaving school he joined the 1st Leinsters as a professional soldier and served in South Africa receiving the South African Campaign Medal and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medals. He also served in India and spent some time in Canada. He was a drill instructor and enjoyed martial arts.

James was married to Mary and they had four children; James, Renee, Sheila and baby Florence, who was born after James’ death. At the time of her husband's death, Mary was visiting her father in Tipperary.

James was awarded the Military Cross in June 1915 for conspicuous bravery in the field. He was wounded whilst out patrolling No Man’s Land from the trenches on the Menin Road. He died at Poperinghe Casualty Clearing Station. He was 39 years old.

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John McFarlane

royal artillery

14th Reserve Battery, Royal Field Artillery. He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial Column 1 Line 22.

The family home was at 90, West King Street, Helensburgh. The son of Isabella McFarlane (widow).
Siblings: John had one brother, Neil and two sisters, Jean and Effie.
John McFarlane was born in Alexandria and was brought up in Helensburgh by his widowed mother.
Before enlisting he was employed as an apprentice joiner in the town.
He died, killed in action at the age of 19.
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George McGeachy

Argylls

1/9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Menin Gate Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 1 Line 23.

 

The family home was at 412, Dumbarton Road, Dalmuir. The son of John and Agnes McGeachy.
Siblings: George had one brother, David.

George McGeachy was born in Helensburgh and later moved to Dalmuir with his family.

He later moved again to Killearn Terrace, Springburn with his brother David, a railway engine driver. He was employed as an engine stoker on the railways before he enlisted.

George was killed in action at Ypres at the age of 24. His remains were not recovered.

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William Butler McLaren

Black Watch

9th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on St Andrew’s Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 26.

The family home was Hermitage Higher Grade School, 9, Argyll Street, Helensburgh. The son of David McLaren.
Siblings: Not Known.

William McLaren was born at Redgorton, Perthshire and spent 27 years as a professional soldier with the Black Watch. He served in the Egyptian War of 1884-5 and received the Nile Expedition Medal, campaign medal and Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He was employed at the Hermitage Higher Grade School in Helensburgh as Janitor, where he was bringing up his family with his wife, Elizabeth. He had four children; William (who served at sea), Isobel, David and Elspeth.

At the outbreak of war, William rejoined his regiment. He was killed in action in France at the age of 49. His body was interred at Philosophe following a concentration from battlefield cemeteries after the Armistice.

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Herbert Wardlaw Milne

74th Punjabis

74th Punjabis Indian Army
He is remembered with honour on the Neuve-Chapelle Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 29.

The family home was at Union Bank House, Colquhoun Square, Helensburgh. The son of James Milne (banker) and Elizabeth Milne (nee Warlaw).
Siblings: He had an older brother serving in the Indian Expeditionary Force and two other brothers serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps.
 Herbert Milne became a professional soldier, commissioned as 2nd Lt. in the Duke of Connaught's Own Sligo Garrison Artillery Militia in 1902 at the age of 19. He transferred to the South Staffordshire Regiment and then to the Indian Army in 1906.
He fought in the South African war and was awarded the King George's Dunbar Medal and the Queen's Medal with two clasps.
With the 74th Punjabis Indian Army, he was serving as adjutant to the 6th Batt. Cameron Highlanders. He died at Loos aged 32. His remains were not recovered. He was mentioned in dispatches, posthumously.
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John O'Brien

Highland Light Infantry

10th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Loos Memorial, St. Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 30.

The family home was Alma Place, Helensburgh The son of Mrs O'Brien
Siblings: John had a brother, Michael.
John O'Brien was born in Kerry Island, Ireland and was later living with his widowed mother in Alma Place, Helensburgh.
After being reported as missing, John was later confirmed dead, killed in action.
His remains were not recovered.

Duncan Currie Patterson

Canadian Expeditionary Force

16th Batt. Canadian Infantry, Manitoba Regiment, Canadian Expeditionary Force
He is remembered with honour on the Canadian War Grave Commission Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 31.

The family home was 75, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh. The son of William and Elizabeth Patterson (nee Currie).
Siblings: Not Known.
Duncan Patterson was born at 75, Sinclair Street in Helensburgh where his father was a mason.
He joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and served in the Boer War for which he earned the Victoria Medal. As a sergeant, he married Mary Conchie and later emigrated to Canada. Wages from his employment there as a stone cutter were low and it took 2 years to save enough to send for his wife and children. Unfortunately, his unit sailed for England before she arrived and their ships passed so closely on the St. Lawrence that they could call to each other.
Duncan died, killed in action, aged 42. He left a wife and 6 children.
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Joseph Pratt

Argylls

1/9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlander
He is remembered with honour on the Menin Gate Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Congregational Church Memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 32.

The family home was Green House, 84, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of James Pratt (boot top cutter) an Annie Pratt (nee McFarlane).

 Joseph Pratt was born in Ayr and then lived with his Grandmother, Mary Baxter, at Green House in Helensburgh. After leaving school, he was apprenticed to C.B. Ross, Sinclair Street as a shoemaker.
Joseph had been a member of the local territorials and volunteered at the outbreak of war.
Joseph died, killed in action when shot in the head by a sniper whilst filling sandbags. It is noted in his obituary that he was buried in a military churchyard, but the location of his grave is unknown.
He was 23 years of age.
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Frank Lawson Ramsay

Royal Navy

Royal Navy Reserve
He is remembered with honour on Portsmouth Naval Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, St Andrew’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 33.

The family home was 8, Prince Albert Terrace, Victoria Road, Helensburgh The son of James Ramsay (widower) of Anne Cottage, Willis Street, Forfar.
Siblings: Frank had an older brother, Herbert and two younger brothers, Norman George and Alfred, and two sisters, Lily and Agnes.
Frank Ramsay was born in Forfar and brought up by his widowed father.
It is believed that Frank moved to Helensburgh when he was employed as second engineer on the steam yacht 'Hebe' owned by Sir Thomas Coat.
He married Esther Lewis at the United Free Church, Scotstoun and lived in Albert Terrace in Helensburgh.
Frank died when his Torpedo Boat. HM TB 96, was involved in a collision in the Straits of Gibraltar. He was lost at sea aged 29.
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