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James Black

Cameron Highlanders

1st Batt. Scottish Rifles (Cameronians)
He is remembered with honour on the Tyne Cot Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, Old Parish Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 2 Line 28.

The family home was firstly at 34, Colquhoun Street where James was born, and later at 19, West King Street, Helensburgh.
The son of James and Annie Duncan Black.

Siblings: James had two brothers who both served, Peter with the Canadian Contingent, having emigrated, and David with the Motor Transport Unit. Both brothers survived the war.
James was married to Katherine (nee McFarlane) and lived at 94 West Scotland Street, Glasgow where they were bringing up their four young children.
James was killed in action in Belgium in 1917 at the age of 32.

Connell Boyce

Argylls

9th Batt. then the 10th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 29.

The family home was 24 John Street, Helensburgh The son of Connell Boyce (surfaceman for the Railway Company) and Janet Stevenson Harper Boyce.
Siblings: Three brothers, Patrick, Charles and James and three sisters, Agnes, Bridget and Elizabeth. His older brother, Charles, also fought with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in the war.

Connell (Conall) Boyce was born and grew up in Helensburgh, where his father was a surface man on the railways. He came from a large family of seven children and was educated at Clyde Street School. His father, also Connell, was born in Ireland and his mother came from Bannockburn, Stirlingshire.

Connell enlisted at the age of 17. Only two years later he lay injured on the Fields of Flanders. Taken to the military hospital, he had an arm amputated but died shortly after. Connell was only 19 years old.

The parents chose the inscription for his grave which read: 'In the shelter of thy sacred heart Dear Jesus may he rest'.

Walter Bain

Argylls

9th Batt. then the 1st/7th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He is remembered with honour on the Arras War Memorial, Bay 9, St Andrews Kirk Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 36.

The family home was at 33 East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of Mr Walter a retired baker and Mrs Margaret Bain. Walter was married to Agnes Lennon Bain of 32 Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh.
Siblings: Walter had three younger sisters, Christine, Elizabeth and Margaret.

Walter Bain was born in Row (Rhu) and was brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a retired baker.  He was employed as an ironmongery warehouseman before enlisting.
At the outbreak of the war he married Agnes Lennon of 32, Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh, before being deployed to France and Flanders.
Walter was discharged on account of ill health but was recalled, serving in France from November 1916.  He was first reported missing on 25th March 1917 and then declared killed in action on that date. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Arras Memorial.

George Anderson

royal scots

1st Batt. and then the 3rd Batt. Royal Scots Guards
He is remembered with honour on The Menin Gate. Ypres, St Bride’s Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 27.

The family home was at 5, Colquhoun Street, Helensburgh. The son of George and Lindsay Anderson.
Siblings: George had two sisters, Marie and Christina and two brothers, Robert and David.

George Anderson was brought up in the town, where his father was a travelling draper. He was the eldest child with two brothers and two sisters who all lived at home with their parents and grandmother; Violet Lindeagle.

On the 1901 Census he was described as working as a postman with the G.P.O. By the time he joined up, George was employed at the Singer Sewing Machine Factory at Kilbowie. Clydebank. He was living in Clydebank when he enlisted.

George was reported as wounded in October 1915 but returned to the front. He died of wounds received fighting in the torrential rain at Flanders Fields on 31 July 1917. His remains were not recovered. He is remembered on the Menin Gate at Ypres. (Panel 11).

His brother Robert served with the 2nd Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Andrew Alexander Cameron Adam

royal scots fusiliers

13th Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers. He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, Morayshire Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 2 Line 26.

Andrew first came to Helensburgh from Morayshire as an apprentice gardener, later promoted to gardener, to Francis Henderson of Ardencaple Castle. In June 1916, he first joined the Scottish Rifles, (Service No. 20070), and then transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers.
He was married and lived in the Castle Lodge; a property attached to his employment.
The son of Andrew Mary Cameron Adam of Meadowhillocks Farm, Burghead.

Andrew died at Arras, killed by shell fire. He was 36 years old.
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