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Herbert Brinn Brown

Argylls

1/9th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Columba’s Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 11.

His family home was at East Thorn, 14 Adelaide Street, Helensburgh.
The son of James and Charlotte (nee Brinn) Brown.
Siblings:  His brothers Stanley and David both served during the war. Pictured here, Herbert is seated.

Herbert Brown was born at 72, East Princes Street in Helensburgh and was educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School. His father, James, was a local fishmonger.

He trained as a banker with the local branch of the Bank of Scotland, later transferring to Perth and then to Glasgow head office.

Herbert was a keen athlete and served as secretary of both the local amateur rowing club and the swimming club.

Herbert was badly wounded at the Battle of Ypres and died of his wounds in hospital in Boulogne. He was 29 years of age.

William Alan Ure

royal artillery

Royal Field Artillery
He is remembered with honour on Larchfield School memorial, Merchiston Castle School Roll of Honour, the Congregational Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 33.

The family home was Balvaird, 2, Abercromby Street, Helensburgh. The son of William Primrose Ure and Elizabeth McGregor Ure.
Siblings:  William had one brother John Regent who died in infancy.

William Ure was born in Glasgow before moving to Helensburgh with his family. He attended Larchfield School and then Merchiston Castle School in Edinburgh. He was a prefect at Merchiston and a keen athlete.
William had planned to join the family business, Messrs John Ure and Sons, flour millers and merchants, but enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery, and was commissioned into the 3rd Lowland Brigade, at the outbreak of war.
He served in Palestine in the B Battery, 262nd Brigade and was mentioned in despatches. William died, from wounds received in the Third Battle of Gaza. He was 23 years old.
His gravestone inscription reads: 'Loyal and Faithful unto Death'.

Ian Ure

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School Roll of Honour, Loretto College Roll of Honour, the Congregational Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 25.

The family home was Rockbank, 142, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh. The son of John Gibb Ure (flour merchant) and Agnes Ross Ure (nee Auld).
Siblings: Ian had one younger sister, Marjorie.

Ian Ure was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a flour merchant in the family business Messrs. John Ure and Sons. His grandfather was Glasgow Lord Provost John Ure and his uncle Lord Strathclyde. He was educated at Larchfield School and then at Loretto College in Edinburgh. There he was a prefect and played rugby, hockey and cricket. He then became a partner in his father’s business.
He married Elizabeth Winifred Arrol of Torwoodhill, Rhu. He had served in the Argyll Territorials and rose to the rank of Captain. He was on the reserve officer’s list at the outbreak of war and was commissioned. He served in France as Company Commander of the 6th Batt., notably at Vimy Ridge. Later, fighting in Italy in December 1917, he was awarded the Military Cross 'For distinguished service in the field'.
Ian was 32 years old when he died of injuries when a bomb accidentally exploded. At the time of his death, he was resident at 77, St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. His gravestone is inscribed: ‘Beloved son of John G. Ure and deary loved husband of Winifred Ure’.

Hugh Todd

Royal Engineers

17th Div. Royal Engineers. Inland Water Transport Batt
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 21.

The family home was 42, East King Street, Helensburgh. The son of James (master slater) and Agnes Todd (nee Rice).
Siblings:  Hugh had one brother, James, who did not serve. Andrew and Robert both served in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and survived the war.

 Hugh Todd was born at 15, William Street and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a master slater.
He enlisted in Royal Engineers and served in the Inland Waterways Transport Batt., responsible for transporting the wounded to the coast to be sent home.
Hugh was admitted to hospital with pneumonia on the 3rd of April. His father was summoned to his bedside at the military hospital in France but arrived too late. He died on the 21st of April. He was 28 years of age.
His gravestone inscription reads: 'Dearly loved, sadly missed'.

William Thomson

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Congregational Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 34.

The family home was 31, West Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of Thomas and Jane Thompson, 129, Ward Street, Kalgoorie, Western Australia.
Siblings:  William had one older brother, Samuel, and two older sisters.

 William Thomson was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a baker. On leaving school, William followed his father into the trade. At some point the family emigrated to Australia and it is not known whether William remained in Scotland with relatives or returned to enlist.
He enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and served as a stretcher bearer.
William died, killed in action, at Arras at the age of 22. His remains were not recovered.

James Thomson

Kosb

2nd Batt. King’s Own Scottish Borderers
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 32.

The family home was 90, West Princes Street, Helensburgh.

 James Thomson was born in Glasgow and nothing is known of his early life.
Later he was employed by Messrs Osborne, Contactors, West Princes Street and after marrying he lived at 90, West Princes Street.
James died of gunshot wounds to his back, leg and arm, received in battle, after serving only 5 months in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers. He was 20 years old.
The inscription on his headstone reads: 'Private Thomson belongs to Glasgow'.

Hugh Thomson

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Canadian Expeditionary Force
He is remembered with honour on the Canadian War Memorial, Belgium, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 44.

The family home was Not Known. The son of Mr Fred Thomson of Montreal.

Hugh Thomson was born in Glasgow and moved to Helensburgh, where his father had a dairy at 61a West Princes Street. It is reported that he emigrated to Canada with his father, Fred, around 1910.
He was employed as a plumber in Montreal, before joining the 24th Batt. Quebec Regt. Canadian Infantry. Hugh was married with one child, after his death his widow and child were residing at 21, Ashgrove Street, Bridgeton.
Hugh died of wounds received in battle at the age of 22 years. 

George Edwin Thomson

RAF

Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Allan Glen’s School Book of Remembrance, University of Glasgow Roll of Honour, St Michaels and All Angels memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 33.

The family home was Glenfuelan, Millig Street, Helensburgh. The son of James and Ellen Thomson
Siblings: George was an only son. 

George Thomson was born in Rangoon, Burma where his father worked. Moving to Helensburgh, he was educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School, Allan Glens School in Glasgow and Glenalmond School in Perthshire before going to Glasgow University, studying for the civil service. He was a member of the local swimming club and played rugby.
George was commissioned into the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, directly from University, before joining the R.A.F. During his time in France, he brought down 21 German planes. Fighting against the famous Red Baron over Ypres. He received the Military Cross and the Distinguished Service Order, both for 'Conspicuous Gallantry and Devotion to Duty'.
George died, when his plane burst into flames and crashed, at Port Meadow, Wolvercote after refuelling. He was 21 years old. 

John Bennet Taylor (Jack)

Argylls

2nd Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Arras Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, St Michael and All Angels Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 31.

The family home was 97, West Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of John Bennett Taylor (butcher) and Euphemia Taylor (nee Young).

 

John Taylor (known as Jack) was born in Alloa and moved to Helensburgh, where his father was a butcher. On leaving school, he followed his father's profession and became an apprentice butcher with Mr John Brown in the town.
Jack married Jessie Robertson (domestic servant) at St Michael and All Angels Church in June, 1915
He enlisted in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in November, 1916 and was sent to France the following February.
Jack died, killed in action, only 3 months later. He was 27 years old. His remains were not recovered.  His brother-in-law, David Robertson, was killed in 1915 and is also named on the memorial.

Edward Sweeney

Black Watch

8th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 32.

The family home was 9, John Street, Helensburgh The son of James Sweeney (gardener) and Bridget Sweeney.
Siblings: Edward had 2 brothers, James and Charles and a sister, Sarah.

 

Edward Sweeney was born in Helensburgh, where his father was a gardener. He followed his father’s profession by becoming a gardener to Mr Kidston of Rosebank.
It is believed that Edward originally joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and then transferred to the Black Watch.
Edward died, killed in action, at Hill 41 in Belgium. He was 26 years old.
His name was put forward for the Memorial by his sister, Sarah, who was still living at 11 Colquhoun Square in the town.
His brother James, residing at 34 Blyth Road, West Kensington, London, sent the inscription for his headstone, which read: 'Gone But Not Forgotten'. 

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