1916 (30)

These are the stories behind those who fell between 1916-17

Wednesday, 06 May 2020 07:24 Written by

Walter Battison

New Zealand

New Zealand Expeditionary Force, 1st Batt. Wellington Regiment.
He is remembered with honour on
the Caterpillar Valley Memorial, Somme, France, the Scottish National War Memorial, The Park Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial Column 1 Line 48.

The family home was at Kilbride Farm, Row where his father farmed. After the death of her husband, Elizabeth moved to Paxtonville, 34 Montrose Street, Helensburgh, where she lived throughout the war.
The son of the late Walter and Mrs Elizabeth Battison.

Siblings: Walter had one brother, James, and two sisters, Annie and Mary.

Walter Battison was brought up on Kilbride Farm, Row Parish. It was quite a large farm employing three farm labourers and three dairymaids. Walter attended the Hermitage School, but, as the older brother took over the farm, he emigrated to New Zealand. This was some fifteen years before the outbreak of war.
He was home on a visit when war broke out and when he returned to New Zealand joined the Wellington Regiment and returned to fight for his home country.
He first served in Egypt and then France, dying at the Somme aged 38 years.

James Carson

Quebec regiment

4th Batt. Canadian Contingent of Infantry, Quebec Regiment. He is remembered with honour on the Vimy Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 50.

The family home was at Holyrood Place, 124 West Princes Street, Helensburgh. Siblings: James had two brothers, Sergeant Jack Carson also serving and a younger brother Robert who was too young to serve.

The son of Robert and Margaret Combs Carson who ran a painting and decorating business from 71 West Clyde Street in the town.

James Carson was brought up in Helensburgh, the son of the local painter and decorator. He was educated at Hermitage School and went on to become a law apprentice in the office of Messrs George MacLachlan and Son.
He had emigrated 8 years before the war to work for the Railway Company in Canada but returned to fight for King and Country.
First reported missing, it was then confirmed he had been killed in action.
He is remembered on the Vimy Memorial - the highest point on the Vimy Ridge at Arras. The Memorial reads: 'To the Valour of their countrymen in the Great War and in Memory of their sixty thousand dead this monument is raised by the people of Canada'.

Alexander Kirkwood Comrie

Highland Light Infantry

9th Batt. (Glasgow) Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 51.

The family home was at 15, Dixon Avenue, Crosshill, Glasgow.
The son of Daniel and Agnes (nee Armour) Comrie.

Alexander Comrie was born at Fairyknowe, 30 Lomond Street, Helensburgh where his father, Daniel, was a bottled water manufacturer (The Fairy Springs) and also a Town Councillor and Baillie. He was educated at the Hermitage School and was employed as a Clerk in the Burgh Surveyors Office. The family moved to Glasgow and he enlisted at the outbreak of war.
Alexander died during the battle at the Somme, taken ill he died of peritonitis. He was only 20 years of age.
His parents had inscribed on his headstone, 'They loved not their lives unto death'.

Written by

Thomas Docherty

Argylls

8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 52.

The family home was at 23, East Princes Street The son of Thomas Docherty, journeyman mason (deceased) and Mary Johnston, domestic servant, (unmarried).
Thomas Docherty was born in Helensburgh and marked on his birth certificate as illegitimate. Thomas was brought up by his paternal grandmother at 23, East Princes Street in the town. After leaving school, he trained as an upholsterer and moved to Glasgow where he married and was bringing up one small child at Flemington Street, Springburn when called to serve.
Thomas died of wounds received in battle, he was 33 years of age.
Monday, 29 June 2020 04:23 Written by

Michael Garrity

Argylls

1st Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Joseph’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 1.

The family home was at 44, Maitland Buildings, Helensburgh. The son of Not Known

Michael Garrity was born in Glasgow. He worked as a carrier in Helensburgh.
He was married and was bringing up three small children at Maitland Buildings, Helensburgh.
The 1st Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders embarked from Marseilles for Macedonia, arriving at Salonika on the 12th December, 1915. Michael was killed in action at the Capture of Karajakois, fighting the Bulgarian Army. He was aged 25 years.

Friday, 12 June 2020 12:59 Written by

William Gillies

2nd Canadian contingent

2nd Canadian Contingent He is remembered with honour on the Royal Bank of Canada Roll of Honour, Park Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 2

The family home was at The Avenue, Craigendoran, Helensburgh The son of Captain Malcolm Gillies and Mrs Catherine Gillies.
Siblings: William had one sister, Neta who was a piano teacher. A brother Lt. Malcolm Gillies served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlander and, although wounded at Loos, survived the war.

William Gillies was born in Alexandria and moved to Helensburgh where his father was the Master of the steam ship Waverley. William was employed at the Union Bank of Scotland for 4 years before moving to the Montreal, Quebec branch. In 1909, he became chief accountant with the Royal Bank of Canada in Vancouver. William returned to fight for his home country, firstly with the 29th Batt. British Columbian Regt. and then the 2nd Canadian Contingent.
William died at the Battle of Dickebusch (Ypres), killed in action, aged 26.

Saturday, 13 June 2020 08:33 Written by

John Graham

2nd Canadian contingent

8th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Scottish National Memorial and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 3.

The family home was at Avoca, 9, The Avenue, Craigendoran.
The son of John Graham and Susan Ferguson Graham of 1, Central Ave, Broomhill Terrace, Partick.

John Graham was born in Glasgow and at one time lived at Avoca, Craigendoran. He served an apprenticeship with Messrs Stephen, Linthouse before serving as an engineer on the Clyde.
John emigrated to New Zealand and returned to enlist at the outbreak of war.
John died, killed in action, at the Somme. His remains were not recovered. He was aged 24.

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Roderick Hilton Halsey

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Congregational Church Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 4.

The family home was at Park House, 72 East King Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Mr John Halsey (butcher) and Mary Jane Halsey (nee McCrone).
Siblings: Older brother, John, was a butcher, which was a protected profession, and did not serve.

 

Roderick Halsey was born at Ardgowan Place, 77 East Princes Street in Helensburgh and brought up in the town where his father had a butchers shop at 32 East Princes Street.
He was employed as an apprentice with his brother as a flesher before joining up at the outbreak of war.
Roderick died, killed in action, at Ypres. He was 27 years old.
It was reported that he was resident in Glasgow and the time of his death.

John Healy

Highland Light Infantry

16th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Loos Memorial, St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 53.

Siblings:

John Healy was born in Glasgow and no connection to Helensburgh can be established although it is believed he was related to a Miss Catherine Healy who lived at 49, West King Street in the town. John died at Flanders, firstly reported missing and then confirmed killed in action.
It is reported that his residence was in Uddingston at the time of his death.

Written by

Thomas Howie

royal scots fusiliers

9th Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers He is remembered with honour on St Brides Church Roll of Honour and the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 5.

The family home was at 37, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Alexander Howie (carter) and Jane Howie

Thomas Howie was born at Dundonald, Ayrshire. His father worked as a carter. Thomas was employed as a cab driver with Messrs Waldie in Helensburgh.

He had married Agnes Reid, a domestic servant, in Troon in 1908 and was bringing up three young children.

Thomas was killed in action at the Somme. He was 33 years of age.

Tuesday, 16 June 2020 12:18 Written by

Alexander Laird

Argylls

1st. Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St Andrew Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 6.

The family home was at 122, East Princes Street, Helensburgh. The son of John Laird (tailor) and Catherine Laird.

Alexander Laird was born in Aberdeen and moved to Helensburgh where his father was a tailor.
He was employed as a plumber with the firm of Crawfords in Helensburgh before he enlisted.
He was killed in action at Salonika at the age of 25. He was unmarried.

Monday, 29 June 2020 04:09 Written by

Robert Lyle Hedley

Gordons

9th Batt. Gordon Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St. Michael and All Angels Church Memorial, Merchiston Castle School Memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 7.

The family home was at Strathculm, 32, West Montrose Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Robert and Jane Hedley Scott Lyle.
Siblings: One brother Peter was commissioned into the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and was severely wounded but survived the war. He had two younger siblings, Nancy and Kenneth.

Hedley Lyle was born in Greenock where his father was a ships chandler. He was educated at Collegiate School in Greenock and Merchiston Castle School in Edinburgh.
Hedley was a keen athlete, played rugby football for the West of Scotland, was a member of both the Helensburgh and Greenock cricket clubs and a keen golfer.
He was employed by Estancias of Corbett in Argentina as a ship’s store merchant before returning to enlist in the Scottish Horse in 1914 and then commissioned to the Gordon Highlanders.
Hedley died, killed by machine gun fire, aged 32 years.

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Donald MacLachlan

Royal Scots

1st Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the Menin Gate, Ypres, Park Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 11.

The family home was 47, Grant Street, Helensburgh The son of Donald and Jane McLachlan.
Donald MacLachlan was brought up by his parents at 47, Grant Street in the town.
He served with the Royal Scots Fusiliers and was killed at Ypres, aged 31.
His remains were not recovered.
Written by

Malcolm Graham McBryde (McBride)

Australian Imperial Force

45th Batt. Australian Imperial Force Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 8.

The family home was at 126, West Princes Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Andrew and Margaret McBryde.
Siblings: Two brothers, Alex McBryde who joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and William McBryde who was a gunner with the R.G.A. Both brothers survived the war.
Malcolm McBryde was born and brought up in Helensburgh. After training as a blacksmith, before emigrating to Australia. He returned with the Australian Imperial Force to fight for his home country. Malcolm died in Flanders at the age of 34 years.
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William McDonald

Argylls

9th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 7.

The family home was at 50, East Princes Street, Helensburgh. The grandson of Captain Archibald McDonald (Yachtsman) and Helen McDonald who lived in Maitland Buildings. The son of Archibald McDonald (house painter).
Siblings: William had an older sister, Mary.

 

William McDonald was born in Glasgow. He was brought up, along with his sister, in Helensburgh by his father, who was a house painter, and his grandparents.

William served his apprenticeship as a baker with Mr McAdam before enlisting in 1915.

William died of wounds received in battle. He was 24 years of age.

Written by

William McDougall

Argylls

1/8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Old Parish Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial Column 2 Line 9.

The family home was at Back Cottage, 55, West King Street and later at 53, James Street, Helensburgh.
The son of Dugald and Annie Morton Thomson McDougall.
Siblings: John, Jennet, Dugald, Robert, Annie and Marion. John, his older brother, also died in the war. Dugald and Robert did not serve.
William McDougall was born and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a domestic gardener.
He was employed as a gardener with the Donaldson Family at Blairvadach House before enlisting in September, 1914.
William was first reported missing in action and it was later confirmed that he had died in battle. He was aged 27 years. His remains were not recovered.
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Abraham McKillop

Black Watch

10th Batt. Black Watch
He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 10.

The family home was 53, James Street, Helensburgh. The son of Archibald and Jane McKillop
Siblings: Abraham had four brothers, James, Archibald, John and David and four sisters, Kate, Lizzie, Jane and Annie. His brother Archibald also died in the war.
Abraham McKillop was born in Helensburgh where his father worked as a coachman. On leaving school, he worked as a carter with the North British Railway Company.
At the outbreak of war, Abraham joined the Black Watch. He died, of dysentery, in a Malta hospital. He was 26 years of age.
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Hugh McLaughlin

Scottish Rifles

1/8th Batt. Scottish Rifles
He is remembered with honour on St Joseph’s Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 12.

The family home was at East King Street, Helensburgh.The son of James and Elizabeth McLaughlin.
Siblings: Not Known
Hugh McLaughlin was born in Helensburgh where his father worked as a stone mason.
He was employed as a dock labourer before joining up. He was married to Helen Bowden in Pollockshields in 1910.
Hugh was registered as missing in August of 1915 and officially declared dead in June of 1916. He was 35 years old.
His wife was living at 22, Portman Street, Paisley Road, Glasgow at the time of his death.
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Samuel McWilliam(s)

Cameronians

Cameronians, 5th Batt. Scottish Rifles
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, the Helensburgh Post Office Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 13.

The family home was 4, Houston Square, Johnstone. The son of John and Elizabeth McWilliam
Siblings: Samuel had three brothers, James, Edward and Joseph.

Samuel McWilliams was born in Ireland and brought up in Paisley. He was a telegraph messenger and then a postman before enlisting in the Scottish Rifles.

Samuel died at the Battle of Beaumont- Hamel at the Somme.

His remains were not recovered. He was approximately 32 years of age.

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James Mundie

Royal Navy

Royal Navy He is remembered with honour on the Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 14.

The family home was at 65, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Mr and Mrs James Mundie.
Siblings: James had a brother Private John Mundie serving with the Tyneside Scottish and reported as a prisoner of war in August, 1918. 
James Mundie was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. Before enlisting he was employed as a gardener at 'Ardvuela'.
At the outbreak of war, he joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He served on the battle cruiser, HMS Lion, which was involved in the Battle of Jutland.
It was reported that he was killed instantly by a ship's davit falling on him. This was just after the battle. He was 26 years of age.
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John Glen Paton

royal scots fusiliers

2nd Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the St. Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 4.

The family home was 27, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh The son of Lilias Paton
Siblings: John had two sisters, Lilias and Jeannie and two brothers James and Adam. Adam also served and survived.
John Paton was born in Row (Rhu) and was brought up by his widowed mother. After serving his apprenticeship in the stationery trade with Macneur and Brydon, he attained a senior position with William Lyon, Stationers, Glasgow.
John, first trained with the King's Own Scottish Borderers before being transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers.
John died, killed in action, at the age of 33 years. His remains were not recovered.
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Alfred Anthony Douglas Raeburn

Highland Light Infantry

Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Scottish National War Memorial, Larchfield School Memorial, Glenalmond School Memorial, St Michael and All Angels Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 16.

The family home was Woodend, 20 Millig Street, Helensburgh The son of Sir William H. Raeburn, 1st Baronet of Woodend, and the late Lady Raeburn
Siblings: Alfred had an older brother, William Norman.
 Alfred Raeburn was born in Helensburgh, where is father was in the shipbuilding industry. He was educated at Larchfield School and then Glenalmond College, in Perthshire, where he was a Lance Corporal in the O.T.C.
He completed a course in shipbuilding and engineering with a view to entering his father's business. He was a member of the Helensburgh Cricket Club, played football and enjoyed angling.
Alfred died, killed in action at the Somme. He was 23 years of age. 
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James Robertson

Gordon highlanders

9th Batt. Gordon Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 17.

The family home was Not Known The son of Mr John Robertson
Siblings: His brother, William, was a painter addressed at 2 Charlotte Street, Helensburgh
James Robertson was born in Helensburgh but little is known of his early life. What is known was taken from the Obituary in the Helensburgh and Gareloch Times of the day.
James died at the Somme, killed in action by a German Sniper.
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Matthew [Mathew] Freer Rodger

Scottish Rifles

2nd Batt. Scottish Rifles
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, St Columba’s Church Roll of Honour, Larchfield School Memorial, Merchiston Castle School memorial, Corpus Christi Oxford Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 18.

The family home was Rossland, 19, East Montrose Street, Helensburgh. The son of Campbell and Catherine Rodger.
Siblings: Mathew had one older brother, Patrick.
Mathew Rodger was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town, where his father was a clay pipe manufacturer. He was educated at Miss Johnston's School, Larchfield Academy and Merchiston Castle School, where he was Captain of the school. He attained a B.A. in Greats at Corpus Christi College, Oxford where he was captain of rugby and rowed for the college at Henley. He also studied at Freiburg University and was awarded a BA LLB at Edinburgh in 1911, being admitted as a Writer to the Signet in the same year, later working for Carmichael and Miller WS. He was a keen sportsman enjoying rugby, gymnastics, shooting and sailing off the West Coast.
Mathew was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) in September 1914 and left for France in May 1915. He was killed in action successfully taking a German trench near Le Transloy, aged 30 years. His remains were not recovered.
Matthew was married to his fiancée Nell after his death by a decree of declatory of marriage. He had been unbale to obtain leave to return to marry her and Nell gave birth to their son a week after Matthew’s death.
Written by

John Hamilton Ross

Royal Naval Reserve

Royal Navy
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour, St Columba’s Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 19.

The family home was at Canton Cottage, 5 Suffolk Street, Helensburgh The son of Oliphant and Minnie Ross
Siblings: John had five brothers, James, who served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, David, Oliphant, Thomas and Adam.
John Ross was born in Govan and moved with his family to Helensburgh at a young age, where his father was a boot and shoe agent.
On leaving school he became an apprentice shoemaker. He joined the Royal Navy in early 1916.
John worked as a seaman and in communications. He died in an explosion on board HMS Daybreak and was buried at Archangel, Russia, with full military honours. He was 21 years of age.
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Albert W. Smith

Highland Light Infantry

9th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 20.

The family home was 73, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Alfred and Esther Smith of St. John's, Poplar Avenue, Bishopton.
Siblings: Albert had one brother, Frederick and two sisters, Margaret and Mabel.

Albert Smith was born in Helensburgh and educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School. The family then moved to Erskine and Albert was employed as a bank clerk in Paisley. Albert was hospitalised in October of 1915 with the effects of gas poisoning but returned to the front. He died, killed in action, at the Somme, aged 23 years. His remains were not recovered.
His brother Frederick, died in January 1919.
Their names were added to the memorial by their sister, Margaret, who was employed as a cashier in Helensburgh.

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Hugh Todd

Royal Engineers

17th Div. Royal Engineers. Inland Water Transport Batt
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 21.

The family home was 42, East King Street, Helensburgh. The son of James (master slater) and Agnes Todd (nee Rice).
Siblings:  Hugh had one brother, James, who did not serve. Andrew and Robert both served in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and survived the war.

 Hugh Todd was born at 15, William Street and brought up in Helensburgh, where his father was a master slater.
He enlisted in Royal Engineers and served in the Inland Waterways Transport Batt., responsible for transporting the wounded to the coast to be sent home.
Hugh was admitted to hospital with pneumonia on the 3rd of April. His father was summoned to his bedside at the military hospital in France but arrived too late. He died on the 21st of April. He was 28 years of age.
His gravestone inscription reads: 'Dearly loved, sadly missed'.

Written by

William Walker

royal scots fusiliers

Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial, the Scottish National Memorial, the Old Parish Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 22.

The family home was Camis Eskan, Helensburgh The son of Mr Walker (chauffeur)
Siblings: His brother, Archie, was in the Royal Navy.
William Walker was born in Corstorphine, Edinburgh and later moved to Helensburgh where his father was chauffeur to Mr Gow, at Camis Eskan.
William followed in his father's footsteps being employed as a chauffeur for Dr MacRae, Surgeon at the Stobhill Military Hospital, before enlisting in the spring of 1916.
William was reported missing in action on 30th July 1916 and it was later confirmed that he had died on that date. He was 32 years of age.
His remains were not recovered.