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Frederick C. Smith

Scottish Rifles

1st Batt. Scottish Rifles Cameronians
He is remembered with honour on Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 20.

The family home was 73, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Alfred and Esther Smith of St. John's, Poplar Avenue, Bishopton.
Siblings: Frederick had one brother, Albert and two sisters, Margaret and Mabel.
He died at the Somme, at the age of 36 and was originally buried at Dury Hospital Military Cemetery, before being moved to Villers Bretonneux after the Armistice.
His younger brother, Albert, also died at the Somme in July 1916.
Their names were added to the memorial by their sister, Margaret, who was employed as a cashier in Helensburgh.

Albert W. Smith

Highland Light Infantry

9th Batt. Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 20.

The family home was 73, East Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Alfred and Esther Smith of St. John's, Poplar Avenue, Bishopton.
Siblings: Albert had one brother, Frederick and two sisters, Margaret and Mabel.

Albert Smith was born in Helensburgh and educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School. The family then moved to Erskine and Albert was employed as a bank clerk in Paisley. Albert was hospitalised in October of 1915 with the effects of gas poisoning but returned to the front. He died, killed in action, at the Somme, aged 23 years. His remains were not recovered.
His brother Frederick, died in January 1919.
Their names were added to the memorial by their sister, Margaret, who was employed as a cashier in Helensburgh.

William Smith Sinclair MB, CM, DPH.

Royal army medical corp

New Zealand Army Medical Corps
He is remembered with honour on the New Zealand National War Memorial, Canterbury Provincial Memorial, Christchurch, New Zealand, the University of Glasgow Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 48.

The family home was Lorne House, 108, West Clyde Street, Helensburgh The son of Charles Stewart and Agnes Sillars.
Although described as a Major on the Helensburgh War Memorial, William Sinclair had been promoted to Captain shortly before his death.

William Sinclair was born in Helensburgh and after being educated at Larchfield School, he trained as a Doctor at Glasgow University.

He took up practice, firstly in Wigan, and then in St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. He married May Yuile Duncan and had one son, Keith, before moving, alone, to New Zealand in 1908. His wife was granted a divorce in 1913.

William returned with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, serving in Egypt 1914-15 and on the Western Front 1918-19. He was returning to New Zealand on a troop ship, when taken ill. He died of heart failure following an epileptic seizure. An illness he had suffered from all his life.

George Alexander Sillars

Highland Light Infantry

5th Highland Light Infantry
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, the University of Glasgow Roll of Honour, the Helensburgh Baptist Church Roll of Honour, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Roll of Honour, St Columba’s Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 29.

The family home was Oxford Bank, 74, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh The son of George Alexander (painter and decorator) and Jeanie Sillars
Siblings: George had one sister, Jeanie.

George Sillars was born in Helensburgh, where his father owned a painting and decorating business at 58, Sinclair Street. He was educated at Hermitage Higher Grade School and attended the University of Glasgow, studying dentistry. He was an accomplished musician and played in the Baptist Church. He also played the organ at Dunfermline Abbey while stationed there with the RAMC

George originally enlisted to the Royal Army Medical Corps before transferring to combat duties and served in the Mediterranean, in Egypt, and at Gallipoli before fighting in the Battle of Jerusalem with General Allenby’s forces.

George was killed in action, probably at the Battle of Beit Ur el Tahta. He was 22 years of age.

Neil Sharkey

Argylls

8th Batt. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St. Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 3 Line 28.

The family home was at 16, East King Street, Helensburgh The son of Neil and Mary Sharkey
Siblings: Neil had four brothers, Hugh, who also served in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Andrew, Charles and Dominick, and two sisters, Susan and Bridget. Two older siblings had left home by the time of the 1911 census.

SharkeyNeilheadstone

Neil Sharkey was born in Helensburgh and brought up in the town. He was an apprentice fishmonger and a member of the local territorials, joining in January of 1913.

At the outbreak of war Neil joined the 9th Batt. of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, later transferred to the 8th Batt. Being promoted to Sergeant, he married Mary Orr (domestic servant) in Edinburgh in January 1917.

Neil was wounded in 1915 and recovered to return to the Front. At Arras in 1917, he was killed in action, wounded in the back and shoulder. He was 21 years old. He received the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.
View Neil's Letter from the front

Cornelius (Con) Sharkey

Argylls

1/6th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, St. Joseph's Church Roll of Honour, St Michael and All Angels Church Roll of Honour, and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 29.

The family home was at 27, Maitland Street, Helensburgh The son of Patrick Sharkey (labourer) and Margaret Sharkey (nee Foley). 
Siblings: Con had two younger brothers, Patrick and Peter, and three sisters, Annie, Margaret and Mary.
Con Sharkey was born at Alma Place in Helensburgh, where his father was a labourer. In 1911, the census shows him living at home at 27, Maitland Street. He was employed as a laundry van man. He married Alice McKechnie (domestic servant), in January 1913, and resided at 50, East Princes Street where they were bringing up two young sons.
Con died, killed in action with a gunshot wound to the back, at the Somme.
He was 33 years of age.

William Russell

Royal Flying Corp

Royal Air Force
He is remembered with honour on the Larchfield School Memorial, Fettes College Roll of Honour, St. Bride’s Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 28.

The family home was at Ardluss, Sinclair Street, Helensburgh The son of William and Jane (nee Cannan) Russell.
Siblings: William was the middle son of triplets. John was older and George younger. William was one of five sons including James and Tom, all serving at the front, and one sister, Marion, who was nursing in France.
William Russell was born in Kirkcudbrightshire, one of triplets. Unfortunately, his mother died 3 days later. The family moved to Helensburgh where his father was the factor for Luss Estates. William was educated at Larchfield and Fettes College where he was Captain of the Fives X 1912/13 and the West of Scotland Football Team 1913-14.
William joined the Royal Engineers and then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps after being wounded in the leg whilst acting as an observer. Later taking his pilot’s certificate.
William was flying a De Havilland 4 aircraft on a ferry flight, just three days after the new Royal Air Force was formed by amalgamating the RFC and RNAS. The aircraft stalled and crashed to the ground. He was 23 years of age.
His gravestone reads ‘OF HELENSBURGH, SCOTLAND’.

John Hamilton Ross

Royal Naval Reserve

Royal Navy
He is remembered with honour on the Scottish National War Memorial, Helensburgh and Gareloch Unionist Association Roll of Honour, St Columba’s Church memorial and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 2 Line 19.

The family home was at Canton Cottage, 5 Suffolk Street, Helensburgh The son of Oliphant and Minnie Ross
Siblings: John had five brothers, James, who served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, David, Oliphant, Thomas and Adam.
John Ross was born in Govan and moved with his family to Helensburgh at a young age, where his father was a boot and shoe agent.
On leaving school he became an apprentice shoemaker. He joined the Royal Navy in early 1916.
John worked as a seaman and in communications. He died in an explosion on board HMS Daybreak and was buried at Archangel, Russia, with full military honours. He was 21 years of age.

George Hair Ronald

Royal Engineers

17th Div. Signals Coy., Royal Engineers
He is remembered with honour on the Delhi Memorial (India Gate) and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 4 Line 47.

The family home was 85, Dundas Street, Tradeston, Glasgow The son of George A. Ronald
George Ronald was born in Dumfries and was brought up in Glasgow. On leaving school he was employed as a commercial salesman in oil and tallow. Later being employed in the telephone service of the Glasgow Post Office.
George was married to Elizabeth, who later moved to 1, West King Street in the town.
George joined the local territorials in 1914, later joining the Royal Engineers. He served at Gallipoli before being sent to India. He died of sunstroke, aged 42.

Patrick Joseph Rock

royal scots fusiliers

1st Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers
He is remembered with honour on the Menin Gate Memorial, Scottish National War Memorial, St Joseph's Church Roll of Honour and Helensburgh War Memorial, Column 1 Line 39.

The family home was 136, Princes Street, Helensburgh The son of Mr James and Mrs Mary Rock
Siblings: Patrick had two brothers James and Mathew.
Patrick Rock was born at 136 Princes Street, Helensburgh and was brought up in the town. At the age of 23 he was boarding at 16, Maitland Street, Helensburgh where he married Bridget Garraghan. His wife died around 1900.
He then moved to live with his brother James at 62, Harmony Row, Govan, and worked as a shipfitters helper.
Patrick died, killed in action, at the age of 38. His remains were not recovered.
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